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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French orizon, via Latin horizōn, from Ancient Greek ὁρίζων (horízōn), from ὅρος (hóros, boundary)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

horizon (plural horizons)

  1. The visible, horizontal line or point (in all directions) that appears to connect the Earth to the sky.
    A tall building was visible on the horizon.
  2. The range or limit of one's knowledge, experience or interest.
    Some students take a gap year after finishing high school to broaden their horizons.
  3. The range or limit of any dimension in which one exists.
    • 2003, Miguel de Beistegui, Thinking with Heidegger: Displacements, ISBN 0253110637, page 157:
      Only mortality, this irreducible and primoridal horizon, that very horizon which, in Being and Time, Heidegger so compellingly revealed as the unsurpassable and defining possibility, remains.
  4. (geology) A specific layer of soil or strata
  5. (archaeology, US) A cultural sub-period or level within a more encompassing time period.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin horizōn, from Ancient Greek ὁρίζων (horízōn), from ὅρος (hóros, boundary).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

horizon m (plural horizonten or horizonnen)

  1. horizon
    Synonyms: kim, einder

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin horizōn, from Ancient Greek ὁρίζων (horízōn), from ὅρος (hóros, boundary).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɔ.ʁi.zɔ̃/
  • (file)
  • Homophone: horizons
  • Hyphenation: ho‧ri‧zon

NounEdit

horizon m (plural horizons)

  1. horizon

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ὁρίζων (horízōn).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

horizōn m (genitive horizontos or horizontis); third

  1. horizon

InflectionEdit

Third declension, Greek type, nominative singular in -ōn. Alternative genitive singular and plural and accusative plural may be attested or may be reconstructed by lexicographers due to horizōn having been imported from the Ancient Greek masculine present active participle.

Case Singular Plural
nominative horizōn horizontēs
genitive horizontis
horizontos
horizontum
horizontium
dative horizontī horizontibus
accusative horizonta horizontēs
horizontās
ablative horizonte horizontibus
vocative horizōn horizontēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit