English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Old French orizon, via Latin horizōn, from Ancient Greek ὁρίζων (horízōn), from ὅρος (hóros, boundary).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /həˈɹaɪ.zən/
  • (file)

Noun edit

horizon (plural horizons)

  1. The visible horizontal line (in all directions) where the sky appears to meet the earth in the distance.
    Synonyms: skysill, skyline
    A tall building was visible on the horizon.
  2. (figuratively) The range or limit of one's knowledge, experience or interest; a boundary or threshold.
    Some students take a gap year after finishing high school to broaden their horizons.
    With clinical researchers hard at work, a new treatment is on the horizon.
  3. The range or limit of any dimension in which one exists.
    • 2003, Miguel de Beistegui, Thinking with Heidegger: Displacements, →ISBN, page 157:
      Only mortality, this irreducible and primordial horizon, that very horizon which, in Being and Time, Heidegger so compellingly revealed as the unsurpassable and defining possibility, remains.
  4. (geology) A specific layer of soil, or stratum
  5. (archaeology, chiefly US) A cultural sub-period or level within a more encompassing time period.
  6. Any level line or surface.
  7. (chess) The point at which a computer chess algorithm stops searching for further moves.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin horizōn, from Ancient Greek ὁρίζων (horízōn), from ὅρος (hóros, boundary).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

horizon m (plural horizonten or horizonnen)

  1. horizon
    Synonyms: kim, einder

Descendants edit

  • Indonesian: horizon
  • Papiamentu: hórizòn

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin horizōn, from Ancient Greek ὁρίζων (horízōn), from ὅρος (hóros, boundary).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

horizon m (plural horizons)

  1. horizon

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology edit

From Dutch horizon, from Latin horizōn, from Ancient Greek ὁρίζων (horízōn), from ὅρος (hóros, boundary).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [hoˈrizɔn]
  • Hyphenation: ho‧ri‧zon

Noun edit

horizon (first-person possessive horizonku, second-person possessive horizonmu, third-person possessive horizonnya)

  1. horizon:
    1. the visible horizontal line or point (in all directions) that appears to connect the Earth to the sky.
      Synonyms: kaki langit, ufuk, cakrawala
    2. (geoglogy) a specific layer of soil or strata.
  2. (in extension) sky, atmosphere, space
    Synonyms: ambara, angkasa, awang-awang, bumantara, cakrawala, dirgantara, langit, udara

Compounds edit

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From Ancient Greek ὁρίζων (horízōn).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

horizōn m (genitive horizontis); third declension

  1. horizon

Declension edit

Third-declension noun (non-Greek-type or Greek-type, variant with nominative singular in -ōn).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative horizōn horizontēs
Genitive horizontis
horizontos
horizontum
horizontium
Dative horizontī horizontibus
Accusative horizontem
horizonta
horizontēs
horizontās
Ablative horizonte horizontibus
Vocative horizōn horizontēs

Descendants edit

References edit

  • horizon”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • horizon in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Limburgish edit

Noun edit

horizon f

  1. Veldeke spelling spelling of Hooriṣǫn