stratum

EnglishEdit

 
chalk strata (2)

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin strātum (a spread for a bed, coverlet, quilt, blanket; a pillow, bolster; a bed), neuter singular of strātus, perfect passive participle of sternō (spread). Doublet of estrade.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɹɑːtəm/, /ˈstɹeɪtəm/

NounEdit

stratum (plural stratums or strata)

  1. One of several parallel horizontal layers of material arranged one on top of another.
    Synonym: tier
    • 1884, Alfred Ronald Conkling, Appleton's Guide to Mexico, page 43:
      It is built of alternate strata of brick and clay, and the sides correspond to the direction of the meridians and parallels.
  2. (geology) A layer of sedimentary rock having approximately the same composition throughout.
    Synonyms: bed, layer
    Coordinate term: seam
    • 1961 November, “Talking of Trains: The subsidence problem”, in Trains Illustrated, page 651:
      An illuminating article in a recent issue of the Eastern Region's Civil Engineering News points out that where coal is worked over a reasonably large area, it is not only the whole of the strata above the workings, but also an area beyond which is liable to subside at varying rates after the coal has been removed.
  3. Any of the regions of the atmosphere, such as the stratosphere, that occur as layers.
  4. (biology) A layer of tissue.
  5. A class of society composed of people with similar social, cultural, or economic status.
  6. (ecology) A layer of vegetation, usually of similar height.
  7. (computing) The level of accuracy of a computer's clock, relative to others on the network.
    • 2006, Roderick W. Smith, Linux Samba Server Administration:
      Computers that synchronize themselves to the stratum 1 time servers are known as stratum 2 time servers if they allow others to synchronize to them, and so on.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch stratum, from Latin stratum. Doublet of setrat and strata.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈstratʊm]
  • Hyphenation: stra‧tum

NounEdit

stratum (first-person possessive stratumku, second-person possessive stratummu, third-person possessive stratumnya)

  1. (geology) stratum, a layer of sedimentary rock having approximately the same composition throughout.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From strātus, perfect passive participle of sternō (spread).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

strātum n (genitive strātī); second declension

  1. a bed-covering, coverlet, quilt, blanket
  2. a pillow, bolster
  3. a bed, couch
  4. a horse-blanket, saddle-cloth
  5. a pavement

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative strātum strāta
Genitive strātī strātōrum
Dative strātō strātīs
Accusative strātum strāta
Ablative strātō strātīs
Vocative strātum strāta

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

strātum

  1. accusative supine of sternō

ReferencesEdit

  • stratum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • stratum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • stratum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • stratum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) a street, a made road: via strata
    • (ambiguous) to prostrate oneself before a person: ad pedes alicuius iacēre, stratum esse (stratum iacēre)
    • (ambiguous) all have perished by the sword: omnia strata sunt ferro