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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin imāgō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

imago (plural imagines or imagos or imagoes)

  1. (entomology) The final developmental stage of an insect after undergoing metamorphosis.
    • 1973, Patrick O'Brian, HMS Surprise
      ‘But still,’ he said to himself, drawing the metamorphoses of a red admiral, egg, caterpillar, chrysalis and imago on his pad, ‘what shall I say to him when we meet?’
  2. (psychology) An idealised concept of a loved one, formed in childhood and retained unaltered in adult life.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin imago.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

imago n (plural imago's, diminutive imagootje n)

  1. image
    De Nederlandse fotograaf Anton Corbijn heeft een belangrijke invloed gehad op het imago van de band U2.[1] — The Dutch photographer Anton Corbijn has had an important influence upon the image of the band [U2].
  2. (biology) imago: the full grown form of an insect.

SynonymsEdit

(1) * image


EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

imago (accusative singular imagon, plural imagoj, accusative plural imagojn)

  1. imagination

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin imago.

NounEdit

imago (genitive imago, partitive imagot)

  1. image (a characteristic of a person, group or company etc.)
  2. (zoology) imago, fully grown insect

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈimɑɡo/, [ˈimɑ̝ɡo̞]
  • Hyphenation: i‧ma‧go

NounEdit

imago

  1. image (a characteristic of a person, group or company, how one is, or wishes to be, perceived by others)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of imago (Kotus type 2/palvelu, no gradation)
nominative imago imagot
genitive imagon imagojen
imagoiden
imagoitten
partitive imagoa imagoja
imagoita
illative imagoon imagoihin
singular plural
nominative imago imagot
accusative nom. imago imagot
gen. imagon
genitive imagon imagojen
imagoiden
imagoitten
partitive imagoa imagoja
imagoita
inessive imagossa imagoissa
elative imagosta imagoista
illative imagoon imagoihin
adessive imagolla imagoilla
ablative imagolta imagoilta
allative imagolle imagoille
essive imagona imagoina
translative imagoksi imagoiksi
instructive imagoin
abessive imagotta imagoitta
comitative imagoineen

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *imā + -āgō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eym- (to imitate). Cognate with imitor, aemulus, Sanskrit यम (yáma, pair, twin), Old English emn, efn (equal, level, even). More at even.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

imāgō f (genitive imāginis); third declension

  1. image, imitation, likeness, statue, representation
  2. ancestral image
  3. ghost, apparition
  4. semblance, appearance, shadow
  5. echo
  6. conception, thought
  7. reminder
  8. (rhetoric) comparison
  9. (art) depiction

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative imāgō imāginēs
genitive imāginis imāginum
dative imāginī imāginibus
accusative imāginem imāginēs
ablative imāgine imāginibus
vocative imāgō imāginēs

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • imago in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • imago in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • imago in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • imago in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • an echo: vocis imago, or simply imago
    • creatures of the imagination: rerum imagines
    • to conceive an ideal: singularem quandam perfectionis imaginem animo concipere
    • to sketch the ideal of an orator: imaginem perfecti oratoris adumbrare
  • imago in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin