Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin signum

NounEdit

signum ‎(plural signums or signa)

  1. A sign, mark, or symbol.
  2. (historical) A medieval tower bell used particularly for ringing the 8 canonical hours.[1][2]
  3. (mathematics) A function that extracts the sign of a real number x, yielding -1 if x is negative, +1 if x is positive, or 0 if x is zero.

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica, 9th ed., "Bell".
  2. ^ Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Music, Vol. 2, p. 452.

LatinEdit

 
Latin Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia la

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *sek-(to cut) or *sekʷ-(to follow).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

signum n ‎(genitive signī); second declension

  1. a mark, sign, emblem
  2. a miracle
  3. (Medieval Latin) a signum (medieval tower bell used particularly for ringing the 8 canonical hours)

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative signum signa
genitive signī signōrum
dative signō signīs
accusative signum signa
ablative signō signīs
vocative signum signa

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • signum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • signum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • SIGNUM in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to follow the standards: signa sequi (opp. a signis discedere, signa relinquere)
    • to demand loudly the signal to engage: signum proelii (committendi) exposcere (B. G. 7. 19)
    • to give the signal to engage: signum proelii dare
    • to fight hand-to-hand, at close quarters: collatis signis (viribus) pugnare
    • (ambiguous) statues and pictures: signa et tabulae (pictae)
    • (ambiguous) to begin the march, break up the camp: signa ferre, tollere
    • (ambiguous) to deviate, change the direction: signa convertere (B. G. 1. 25)
    • (ambiguous) to follow the standards: signa sequi (opp. a signis discedere, signa relinquere)
    • (ambiguous) to pluck up the standards out of the ground (to begin the march): signa convellere (vid. sect. XVI. 6, note signa...)
    • (ambiguous) to attack the enemy: signa inferre in hostem
    • (ambiguous) to come to close quarters: signa conferre cum hoste
    • (ambiguous) the retreat is sounded: signa receptui canunt
  • signum in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • signum in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin