impinge

See also: împinge

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin impingō (dash against, impinge). Compare impact, derived from the perfect passive participle of impingō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɪndʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪndʒ

VerbEdit

impinge (third-person singular simple present impinges, present participle impinging, simple past and past participle impinged)

  1. (transitive, now rare) To make a physical impact on.
    Loud noise can impinge on the eardrum, causing temporary hearing damage.
    Synonyms: collide, crash, strike
    • 1638, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy. [], 5th edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed [by Robert Young, Miles Flesher, and Leonard Lichfield and William Turner] for Henry Cripps, OCLC 932915040, partition 1, page 118:
      The ordinary rocks upon which such men do impinge and precipitate themselves, are cards, dice, hawks, and hounds []
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) To interfere with.
    Synonyms: encroach, infringe, trespass
    • 2006 Summer, Keith R. Fisher, “Toward a Basal Tenth Amendment: A Riposte to National Bank Preemption of State Consumer Protection Laws”, in Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, volume 29, page 981-1034:
      It is astonishing that the meaning of a single declarative sentence enshrined in the Bill of Rights has evaded judicial construction establishing, at a minimum, some bedrock level of state sovereignty upon which the federal government can not impinge.
  3. (intransitive, figuratively) To have an effect upon, especially a negative one.
    Synonyms: affect, limit, touch, influence, impact
    • 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 4, in Lord Stranleigh Abroad[1]:
      “I have tried, as I hinted, to enlist the co-operation of other capitalists, but experience has taught me that any appeal is futile that does not impinge directly upon cupidity. []
    • 1971, George Steiner, “In a Post-Culture”, in In Bluebeard's Castle:
      Nothing in the next-door world of Dachau impinged on the great winter cycle of Beethoven chamber music played in Munich.
    • 1982, Patrick O' Brien, “European Economic Development: The Contribution of the Periphery”, in The Economic History Review, volume 107, number 2, page 445:
      Except for a restricted range of examples, growth, stagnation, and decay everywhere in Western Europe can be explained mainly by endogenous forces. The 'world economy', such as it was, hardly impinged [on Europe].
    • 2017, Rutger Bregman, chapter 3, in Elizabeth Manton, transl., Utopia for Realists, Kindle edition, Bloomsbury Publishing, page 56:
      Scarcity impinges on your mind. People behave differently when they perceive a thing to be scarce.

Usage notesEdit

  • The transitive use is less common, not included in many small dictionaries, and not favored by Garner's Modern American Usage (2009).

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

impinge

  1. third-person singular present indicative of impingere

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

impinge

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of impingō