implore

See also: imploré

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French implorer, from Latin implōrō (I beseech, I implore).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

implore (third-person singular simple present implores, present participle imploring, simple past and past participle implored)

  1. To beg urgently or earnestly.
    • c. 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The VVinters Tale”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene iii]:
      I kneel, and then implore her blessing.
    • 1899, Henryk Sienkiewicz (original), Jeremiah Curtin (translator), In Vain, Chapter 19:
      "Malinka," cried she, "ask no more, I implore thee! Enough, enough! This gentleman has delivered his message. Why lower one's self by an answer?"
  2. To call upon or pray to earnestly; to entreat.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

implore

  1. inflection of implorer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

implore

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of implorar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of implorar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of implorar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of implorar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

implore

  1. inflection of implorar:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative