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See also: LOB, Lob, and løb

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

First attested late 16th c. in the sense "allow or cause to dangle, hang," from sense 2.

VerbEdit

lob (third-person singular simple present lobs, present participle lobbing, simple past and past participle lobbed)

  1. To throw or hit a ball into the air in a high arch.
    The guard lobbed a pass just over the defender.
    The tennis player lobbed the ball, which was a costly mistake.
  2. (colloquial) To throw.
    • 2019 April 6, Quinley, Caleb, “Thailand: Anti-military party leader faces sedition charges”, in Al Jazeera[1], Doha: Al Jazeera, retrieved 2019-04-06:
      In the months leading up to the election, government representatives took up a cybercrime case against Thanathorn for criticising the government on a Facebook Live video... They also lobbed more legal cases at his party for allegedly spreading false information.
  3. (colloquial) To put, place
    Lob it in the pot.
  4. (sports) To hit, kick, or throw a ball over another player in a game.
    • 2011 January 15, Nabil Hassan, “Wigan 1 - 1 Fulham”, in BBC[2]:
      Wigan took the lead when Hugo Rodallega lobbed David Stockdale from close range having earlier headed against the post.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To let fall heavily or lazily.
    • Shakespeare
      And their poor jades / Lob down their heads.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

lob (plural lobs)

  1. (ball sports) A pass or stroke which arches high into the air.
    The guard launched a desperate lob over the outstretched arms of the defender.
    • 2011 February 12, Nabil Hassan, “Blackburn 0 - 0 Newcastle”, in BBC[3]:
      Peter Lovenkrands went close for the Magpies, hitting the bar with a fine lob after he had been played in by the excellent Jose Enrique on the left.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From an Old English word for lumpish or unwieldy things, from Proto-Germanic *lubbǭ (that which hangs or dangles), from Proto-Indo-European *lep- (to peel, skin). Compare Danish lobbes (bumpkin, clown), Old English loppe (spider) (in the sense of something that hangs or dangles). Possibly influenced or borrowed through Welsh llob (lump).

NounEdit

lob (plural lobs)

  1. a lump
    • 1875, M.L. Kenny, The fortunes of Maurice Cronin[4], page 126:
      And, moreover, I had no sooner set my eyes on the keys, than I remembered where there was a lob of money lying in Purcell's safe, that I --
  2. (obsolete) a country bumpkin, clown
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Danish lubbe, from Old Norse lubba, ultimately from sense 2 in the sense of "clumsy, heavily or lumpily hanging."

NounEdit

lob (plural lobs)

  1. A fish, the European pollock.

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

lob (third-person singular simple present lobs, present participle lobbing, simple past and past participle lobbed)

  1. (mining) To cob (chip off unwanted pieces of stone).

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for lob in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

ReferencesEdit

  • Nall, John Greaves (2006): Nall's Glossary of East Anglian Dialect

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek λοβός (lobós).

NounEdit

lob f or m (plural lobben, diminutive lobbetje n)

  1. lobe, lobule
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English lob.

NounEdit

lob m (plural lobs, diminutive lobje n)

  1. lob (arching pass of a ball)
    Synonym: boogbal
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

lob

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lobben
  2. imperative of lobben

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lob m (plural lobs)

  1. (tennis) lob

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English

NounEdit

lob m (invariable)

  1. lob (in ball games)

SynonymsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English lobbe, variant of loppe.

NounEdit

lob

  1. Alternative form of loppe (spider)

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *lubą.

NounEdit

lob n

  1. praise

DescendantsEdit