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See also: Mak, mák, māk, måk, mąk, and -mak

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

mak (third-person singular simple present maks, present participle makin, simple past and past participle maked or made)

  1. (Wearside, dialectal) to make

ReferencesEdit

  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

AnagramsEdit


Car NicobareseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Suggested by Pinnow to derive from an earlier form um-dak, where the second element is cognate to Mundari दाः (dāḥ). The first element may be cognate to U ʔóm and/or Khasi um.

NounEdit

mak

  1. water (salt or fresh)
  2. stream

ReferencesEdit

  • George Whitehead, Dictionary of the Car-Nicobarese Language (1925)
  • Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society (2002), page 80: In Car-Nicobarese mak. Central Nic. dak, Chowra rak, 'water', []
  • Heinz-Jürgen Pinnow, The Position of the Munda Languages within the Austroasiatic Language Family (1963), page 149

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɑk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑk

AdjectiveEdit

mak (comparative makker, superlative makst)

  1. tame (domesticated, tamed)
  2. calm, tame (in a calm state of mind. not agitated)

VerbEdit

mak

  1. first-person singular present indicative of makken
  2. imperative of makken

AnagramsEdit


KurdishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Iranian (compare Persian مادر(mâdar), Baluchi مات(mát), Pashto مور(mor), Ossetian мад (mad), Avestan 𐬨𐬁𐬙𐬀𐬭(mātar)), from Proto-Indo-Iranian (compare Sanskrit मातृ (mā́tṛ), Hindi माता (mātā)), from Proto-Indo-European *méh₂tēr (compare Armenian մայր (mayr), Greek μητέρα (mitéra), Russian мать (matʹ), Italian madre, English mother).

NounEdit

mak ?

  1. mother

Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *makъ, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂ko-

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mak m

  1. poppy (any plant of the genus Papaver)
  2. poppyseed

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • mak in Ernst Muka/Mucke (St. Petersburg and Prague 1911–28): Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow / Wörterbuch der nieder-wendischen Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Reprinted 2008, Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.
  • mak in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

MalayEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened form of emak, from Proto-Malayic *əma-ʔ, from Proto-Malayo-Chamic *əma-ʔ, from Proto-Malayo-Sumbawan *əma-ʔ, from Proto-Sunda-Sulawesi *əma-ʔ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əma-ʔ, from *əma.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mak (Jawi spelling مق‎, plural mak-mak, informal first-person possessive makku, informal second-person possessive makmu, third-person possessive maknya)

  1. Alternative form of emak

North FrisianEdit

NounEdit

mak

  1. kiss

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *makъ, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂kos

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mak m anim

  1. (slang) McDonald's restaurant
    Niedawno otworzyli maka koło mnie.
    They recently opened a McDonald's near me.
  2. (slang, by extension) food from McDonald's

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

mak m inan (diminutive maczek)

  1. poppy, any plant of the genus Papaver

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • mak in Polish dictionaries at PWN

ScotsEdit

VerbEdit

mak (third-person singular present maks, present participle makkin, past made or makkit, past participle made or makkit)

  1. to make
    Mony fowk drink tae mak thaimselves feel blithe.
    Many people drink to make themselves feel happy.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *makъ, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂kos.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mȁk m (Cyrillic spelling ма̏к)

  1. poppy

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *makъ, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂ko-

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mak m (genitive singular maku, nominative plural maky, genitive plural makov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. poppy

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • mak in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SloveneEdit

 
Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *makъ, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂ko-

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

màk or mák m inan (genitive máka, nominative plural máki)

  1. poppy

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old Swedish mak, cognate with Danish mag, Middle Low German mak, German Gemach, assumed to originate from an unattested Old Swedish adjective maker (easy, calm, fit, suiting, appropriate), cognate with Icelandic makr, Old English gemæc, related to German verb machen (to make)

NounEdit

mak n

  1. a state of leisure; almost exclusively used in the expression:
    i sakta mak
    slowly, without hurry

DeclensionEdit

  • Nowadays never inflected, but historically with the definite form maket.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Tok PisinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from German Mark.

NounEdit

mak

  1. (obsolete) shilling

Etymology 2Edit

From English mark.

NounEdit

mak

  1. sign, brand, mark, symbol

VerbEdit

mak

  1. to mark

West FrisianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mak

  1. obedient
  2. tame

InflectionEdit

Inflection of mak
uninflected mak
inflected makke
comparative makker
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial mak makker it makst
it makste
indefinite c. sing. makke makkere makste
n. sing. mak makker makste
plural makke makkere makste
definite makke makkere makste
partitive maks makkers

Further readingEdit

  • mak”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

ZhuangEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Tai *ʰmaːkᴰ (fruit). Cognate with Thai หมาก (màak), Lao ໝາກ (māk), ᦖᦱᧅ (ṁaak), Shan မၢၵ်ႇ (màak).

NounEdit

mak (old orthography mak)

  1. fruit; nut
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

mak (old orthography mak)

  1. kidney
    Synonyms: samndaen, iucij

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

mak (old orthography mak)

  1. smallpox
  2. cowpox
  3. smallpox vaccine