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See also: si̋en and sień

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

sien (plural siens)

  1. Obsolete spelling of scion

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch zien.

VerbEdit

sien (present sien, present participle siende or sienende, past participle gesien)

  1. to see

See alsoEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

sien c

  1. singular definite of si

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin suus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sien (feminine singular sienne, masculine plural siens, feminine plural siennes)

  1. (archaic) his (that which belongs to him); her (that which belongs to her)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German sîn, from Old Saxon sīn. The infinitive sien along with the words is and sünd derive ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁es- (to be), which had no separate infinitive in Germanic. The modern infinitive was probably back-formed in late Old Saxon from the former first-person plural subjunctive sīn (we be), since this form had become identical to the infinitive in other verbs during the late Old Saxon period. Compare also German sein, Dutch zijn.

The original infinitive is wesen, from Middle Low German wesen, from Old Saxon wesan, from Proto-Germanic *wesaną, from *h₂wes- (to reside). All the forms with initial w- (imperative and past tense) derive from this root. The infinitive wesen is still the most used one, but in general which one is used is a matter of personal preference and/or region.

Finally, the forms bün and büst derive from Proto-Germanic *beuną (to be, to become), from *bʰuH- (to become), which survives only as relic forms in the West Germanic languages and not at all in the others. Its infinitive and non-singular forms are only attested in (Old) English.

VerbEdit

sien (past singular weer, past participle wesen or west, auxiliary verb wesen)

  1. (only as the infinitive) Alternative form of wesen

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


Middle DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch sian, from Proto-Germanic *sehwaną.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sien

  1. to see
    • 1249, Schepenbrief van Bochoute, Velzeke, eastern Flanders:
      Descepenen van bochouta quedden alle degene die dese lettren sien selen i(n) onsen here.
      The aldermen of Bochoute address all who will see this letter by our lord.
InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Dutch *sīan, from Proto-Germanic *sīhwaną.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

siën

  1. to filter, to seep
InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See etymology on the main entry.

VerbEdit

sien

  1. inflection of wēsen:
    1. first-person and third-person plural present indicative
    2. first-person and third-person plural present subjunctive

Further readingEdit

  • sien (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • siën”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • sien (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • siën”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

sien

  1. Alternative form of seien

MirandeseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sine.

PrepositionEdit

sien

  1. without

AntonymsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *siuniz (appearance, sight, face), from *sehwaną (to see), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (to see, notice). Cognate with Old Frisian siōne, siūne (face, countenance), Old Saxon siun (vision, sight), Old Norse sýn (face, appearance, countenance), Gothic 𐍃𐌹𐌿𐌽𐍃 (siuns, face, form, countenance).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sīen f

  1. (West Saxon) (senses) power of sight, vision
  2. (West Saxon) eye; pupil
  3. (West Saxon) appearance, countenance

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin seum.

AdjectiveEdit

sien

  1. (stressed) third-person singular possessive pronoun
    1. his
    2. her
    3. one's
    4. its

Usage notesEdit

  • chiefly used after an article (un, le, etc.) and before a noun. The noun may be omitted if clear from the context
    un sien fils
    his son
    enveierai le sien
    I will send his

DescendantsEdit


RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin somnus.

NounEdit

sien f (plural siens)

  1. (Sutsilvan) nap

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A development of older sen (sense, judgement) (compare Italian senno), influenced by conjugated forms of sentir (to feel) (compare siento (I feel)). Ultimately of Germanic origin (compare Dutch zin (meaning, intention), German Sinn (sense, mind), Norwegian sinn (mind), Swedish sinne (mind, sense)), from Proto-Germanic *sinnaz, from Proto-Indo-European *sentnos, from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sien f (plural sienes)

  1. temple (part of the skull on the side of the forehead)

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit