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See also: pían, piān, pián, piǎn, and piàn

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Portuguese piã, or Spanish pian, from the native name in South America.

NounEdit

pian (uncountable)

  1. (medicine) yaws

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for pian in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pian

  1. accusative singular of pia

FinnishEdit

(index pi)

EtymologyEdit

Singular instructive form of pika-.

AdverbEdit

pian (comparative pikemmin, superlative pikimmin)

  1. soon
    Tule pian!
    Come soon!

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish pían, from Old Irish pén, from Medieval Latin pēna, from Latin poena (punishment, pain), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pian f (genitive singular péine, nominative plural pianta or pianacha or piana)

  1. pain
    1. pain of suspense
  2. punishment, penalty

DeclensionEdit

Alternative declension 1
Alternative declension 2

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

pian (present analytic pianann, future analytic pianfaidh, verbal noun pianadh, past participle pianta)

  1. (transitive) pain; punish

ConjugationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
pian phian bpian
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


ItalianEdit

AdverbEdit

pian

  1. Apocopic form of piano

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

pian

  1. Nonstandard spelling of piān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of pián.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of piǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of piàn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish pían, from Old Irish pén, from Medieval Latin pēna, from Latin poena (punishment, pain), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty).

NounEdit

pian f (genitive singular [please provide], plural [please provide])

  1. pain

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
pian phian bian
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pian f

  1. genitive plural of piana

RomanianEdit

NounEdit

pian n (plural piane)

  1. piano

DeclensionEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish pían, from Old Irish pén, from Medieval Latin pēna, from Latin poena (punishment, pain), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty).

NounEdit

pian f (genitive singular péin, plural piantan or pianta or piantaidh)

  1. pain, pang, torture, torment, anguish, trouble, sorrow
  2. punishment

VerbEdit

pian (past phian, future pianaidh, verbal noun pianadh, past participle piante)

  1. torment, torture, pain
  2. distress, annoy
  3. punish

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit