See also: pían, piān, pián, piǎn, and piàn

English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Portuguese piã, or Spanish pian, from the native name in South America.

Noun edit

pian (uncountable)

  1. (medicine, archaic) yaws

References edit

Anagrams edit

Esperanto edit

Adjective edit

pian

  1. accusative singular of pia

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

Singular instructive form of pika-.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpiɑn/, [ˈpiɑ̝n]
  • Rhymes: -iɑn
  • Syllabification(key): pi‧an

Adverb edit

pian (comparative pikemmin, superlative pikimmin)

  1. soon
    Synonyms: heti pitäen, hetkessä, kohta, silmänräpäyksessä, piakkoin, tuota pikaa, (colloquial) kohtsillään, kohtsiltään, piakkoin
    Tule pian!
    Come soon!

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Irish pían, from Old Irish pén, from Medieval Latin pēna, from Latin poena (punishment, pain), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /pʲiən̪ˠ/, /pʲiənˠ/

Noun edit

pian f (genitive singular péine, nominative plural pianta or pianacha or piana)

  1. pain
    1. pain of suspense
  2. punishment, penalty

Declension edit

Alternative declension 1
Alternative declension 2

Derived terms edit

Verb edit

pian (present analytic pianann, future analytic pianfaidh, verbal noun pianadh, past participle pianta)

  1. (transitive) pain; punish

Conjugation edit

Alternative forms edit

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
pian phian bpian
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Adverb edit

pian (apocopated)

  1. Apocopic form of piano

Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

pian

  1. Nonstandard spelling of piān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of pián.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of piǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of piàn.

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Manx edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Irish pían, from Old Irish pén, from Medieval Latin pēna, from Latin poena (punishment, pain), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty).

Noun edit

pian f (genitive singular [please provide], plural [please provide])

  1. pain

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
pian phian bian
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /pjan/
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Syllabification: pian

Noun edit

pian f

  1. genitive plural of piana

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French piano or German Piano, from Italian piano.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

pian n (plural piane)

  1. piano

Declension edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Irish pían, from Old Irish pén, from Medieval Latin pēna, from Latin poena (punishment, pain), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty).

Noun edit

pian f (genitive singular péin, plural piantan or pianta or piantaidh)

  1. pain, pang, torture, torment, anguish, trouble, sorrow
  2. punishment

Verb edit

pian (past phian, future pianaidh, verbal noun pianadh, past participle piante)

  1. torment, torture, pain
  2. distress, annoy
  3. punish

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “pian”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “pían”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language