EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɹuːn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːn

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English prune, from Old French prune, from Vulgar Latin *prūna, feminine singular formed from the neutral plural of Latin prūnum, from Ancient Greek προῦνον (proûnon), variant of προῦμνον (proûmnon, plum), a loanword from a language of Asia Minor. Doublet of plum.

NounEdit

prune (plural prunes)

  1. (obsolete) A plum.
  2. The dried, wrinkled fruit of certain species of plum.
    Hyponym: alubukhara
  3. (slang) An old woman, especially a wrinkly one.

VerbEdit

prune (third-person singular simple present prunes, present participle pruning, simple past and past participle pruned)

  1. (intransitive, informal) To become wrinkled like a dried plum, as the fingers and toes do when kept submerged in water.
    • 2005, Alycia Ripley, Traveling with an Eggplant (page 111)
      I hardly left that spot in my pool that month even when my fingers pruned and chlorine dried out my skin.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French proignier (to trim the feathers with the beak), earlier prooignier, ultimately from Latin pro- ("front") + rotundus (round) 'to round-off the front'.

VerbEdit

prune (third-person singular simple present prunes, present participle pruning, simple past and past participle pruned)

  1. (transitive, horticulture) To remove excess material from a tree or shrub; to trim, especially to make more healthy or productive.
    A good grape grower will prune the vines once a year.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To cut down or shorten (by the removal of unnecessary material).
    to prune a budget, or an essay
  3. (transitive, computer science) To remove unnecessary branches from a tree data structure.
  4. (obsolete) To preen; to prepare; to dress.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Old French prune, from Vulgar Latin *prūna, feminine singular formed from the neutral plural of Latin prūnum, from Ancient Greek προῦμνον (proûmnon).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prune f (plural prunes)

  1. plum
  2. (slang) ticket (traffic citation)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

prūne

  1. vocative singular of prūnus

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French prune, from Vulgar Latin *prūna, from Latin prūnum, from Ancient Greek προῦνον (proûnon), προῦμνον (proûmnon). Doublet of plomme.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prune (plural prunes)

  1. A plum (fruit of Prunus domestica)
  2. A prune (dried plum)
  3. (pathology) A large, rounded boil.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: prune

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *prūna, feminine singular formed from the neutral plural of Latin prūnum.

NounEdit

prune f (oblique plural prunes, nominative singular prune, nominative plural prunes)

  1. plum (fruit)

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prune

  1. plural of prună