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See also: Quiz and quiz'

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Attested since the 1780s, of unknown origin.

  • The Century Dictionary suggests it was originally applied to a popular toy, from a dialectal variant of whiz.
  • The Random House Dictionary suggests the original sense was "odd person" (circa 1780).
  • Others suggest the meaning "hoax" was original (1796), shifting to the meaning "interrogate" (1847) under the influence of to question and inquisitive.
  • Some say without evidence it was invented by a late-18th-century Dublin theatre proprietor who bet he could add a new nonsense word to the English language; he had the word painted on walls all over the city, and the morning after, everyone was talking about it.
  • Others suggest it was originally quies (1847), Latin qui es? (who are you?), traditionally the first question in oral Latin exams. They suggest that it was first used as a noun from 1867, and the spelling quiz first recorded in 1886, but this is demonstrably incorrect.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

quiz (plural quizzes)

  1. (dated) An odd, puzzling or absurd person or thing.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smart to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Thackeray to this entry?)
    • 1796, Fanny Burney, Camilla: or, A picture of youth, by the author of Evelina, page 99:
      I've always heard he was a quiz, says another, or a quoz, or some such word ; but I did not know he was such a book-worm.
    • 1833, Maria Edgeworth, Moral Tales, volume 1, page 204:
      I tell you I am going to the music shop. I trust to your honour. Lord Rawson, I know, will call me a fool for trusting to the honour of a quiz.
    • 1803, Jane Austen, chapter 7, in Northanger Abbey[1], published 1816:
      Where did you get that quiz of a hat? It makes you look like an old witch.
  2. A competition in the answering of questions.
    We came second in the pub quiz.
  3. (education) A school examination of less importance, or of greater brevity, than others given in the same course.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

quiz (third-person singular simple present quizzes, present participle quizzing, simple past and past participle quizzed)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To hoax; to chaff or mock with pretended seriousness of discourse; to make sport of, as by obscure questions.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Thackeray, The History of Pendennis:
      He quizzed unmercifully all the men in the room.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To peer at; to eye suspiciously or mockingly.
  3. (transitive) To question closely, to interrogate.
  4. (transitive) To instruct by means of a quiz.
  5. (transitive) (obsolete, rare) To play with a quiz

TranslationsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English quiz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

quiz c (singular definite quizzen, plural indefinite quizzer)

  1. quiz (competition in the answering of questions)

InflectionEdit

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

quiz m (plural quizzen, diminutive quizje n)

  1. quiz

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

quiz m (uncountable)

  1. quiz

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

quiz m (invariable)

  1. quiz

Derived termsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English quiz.

NounEdit

quiz m (plural quizs)

  1. (Jersey) quiz

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

quiz m (plural quizes)

  1. quiz (question-answering competition)

VerbEdit

quiz

  1. Obsolete spelling of quis

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English quiz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

quiz m (plural quiz)

  1. (television) quiz show