Hungarian

edit

Etymology

edit

An onomatopoeia.[1]

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): [ˈriː]
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes: -riː

Verb

edit

  1. (intransitive, literary, folksy) to weep
    Synonym: sír
  2. (transitive, literary, folksy) to say something while weeping

Conjugation

edit

With its uncommon transitive forms:

Derived terms

edit
Compound words

(With verbal prefixes):

References

edit
  1. ^ in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further reading

edit
  • in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Anagrams

edit

Irish

edit

Etymology

edit

From Middle Irish , from Old Irish ,[1] from Proto-Celtic *rīxs, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (ruler, king).

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

 m (genitive singular , nominative plural ríthe)

  1. king (male monarch)
  2. king (in chess; in cards; in checkers/draughts)

Declension

edit
  • Superseded spelling of genitive singular: ríogh
  • Superseded spelling of dative singular: rígh
  • Alternative nominative plural: ríogha
  • Alternative genitive plural: ríogh

Coordinate terms

edit

Derived terms

edit

See also

edit
Chess pieces in Irish · fir fichille (layout · text)
           
banríon caiseal easpag ridire ceithearnach, fichillín
Playing cards in Irish · cártaí imeartha (layout · text)
             
aon trí ceathair cúig seacht
             
ocht naoi deich cuireata banríon fear na gcrúb, buachaill mór

References

edit
  1. ^ Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  2. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 46
  3. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 96

Further reading

edit

Macanese

edit

Etymology

edit

From Portuguese rir.

Verb

edit

  1. to laugh
    qui istripâto split one's sides laughing (literally, “to laugh until the guts turn over”)
    nê-bôm fazê iou don't make me laugh

References

edit

Middle Irish

edit

Etymology

edit

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *rīxs, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (ruler, king), which is derived from *h₃reǵ-.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

 m (genitive ríg, nominative plural ríg)

  1. king
    • c. 1000, “The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig”, in Ernst Windisch, editor, Irische Texte, volume 1, published 1800, section 1:
      Boí amra for Laignib, .i. Mac Dathó a ainm.
      There was a wonderful king over the Leinstermen; Mac Dathó was his name.

Coordinate terms

edit

Descendants

edit
  • Irish:
  • Manx: ree
  • Scottish Gaelic: rìgh

Further reading

edit

Old Irish

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-Celtic *rīxs, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (ruler, king), which is derived from *h₃reǵ-. Cognates include Sanskrit राज् (rāj, king), राजन् (rājan), and Latin rēx (king).

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

 m (genitive ríg, nominative plural ríg)

  1. king
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 85d7
      amtis forbristi ind ríg, glosses principibus oppressis

Declension

edit
Masculine g-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative rígL ríg
Vocative rígL ríga
Accusative rígN rígL ríga
Genitive ríg ríg rígN
Dative rígL rígaib rígaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Synonyms

edit

Coordinate terms

edit

Derived terms

edit

Descendants

edit

Further reading

edit