Open main menu

Contents

GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

 m (plural dós)

  1. pain
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

 m (plural dós)

  1. (music) do (musical note)
  2. (music) C (the musical note or key)
See alsoEdit

HungarianEdit

 
solmisation

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈdoː]
  • (file)

NounEdit

(plural dók)

  1. do, a syllable used in solfège to represent the first and eight note of a major scale

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative dók
accusative dót dókat
dative dónak dóknak
instrumental dóval dókkal
causal-final dóért dókért
translative dóvá dókká
terminative dóig dókig
essive-formal dóként dókként
essive-modal
inessive dóban dókban
superessive dón dókon
adessive dónál dóknál
illative dóba dókba
sublative dóra dókra
allative dóhoz dókhoz
elative dóból dókból
delative dóról dókról
ablative dótól dóktól
Possessive forms of
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. dóm dóim
2nd person sing. dód dóid
3rd person sing. dója dói
1st person plural dónk dóink
2nd person plural dótok dóitok
3rd person plural dójuk dóik

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Irish cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal :
    Ordinal : dara
    Personal : beirt
    Attributive : dhá, dá

From Old Irish dau, from Proto-Celtic *dwau, from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁.

NumeralEdit

  1. two
Usage notesEdit
  • This form is used independently, not before a noun it modifies. It is always preceded by the particle a:
    a haon, a , a trí...one, two, three...
    bus a bus number two
    a a chlogtwo o’clock
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
  • beirt (used with nouns denoting human beings)
  • dara (ordinal)
  • dhá/dá (used with nouns not denoting human beings)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish dáu, , dóu.

PronounEdit

(emphatic dósan)

  1. third-person singular masculine of do
  2. (Cois Fharraige) third-person singular masculine of de
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Irish dóüd, dód.

NounEdit

 m (genitive singular as substantive , genitive as verbal noun dóite, nominative plural dónna)

  1. burn, scald
  2. burning, scalding, scorching
  3. verbal noun of dóigh
DeclensionEdit
As verbal noun
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

  1. present subjunctive analytic of dóigh
Alternative formsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
dhó ndó
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronounEdit

  1. third-person singular masculine and neuter of do (to, for)

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization

pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndó
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese doo, from Late Latin dolus, from Latin dolor (pain). Compare Spanish duelo.

NounEdit

m or f (in variation) (plural dós)

  1. pity (feeling of sympathy at the misfortune or suffering of someone or something)
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Italian do.

NounEdit

m (plural dós)

  1. (music) do (first tonic of a major scale)
Coordinate termsEdit

VenetianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Compare Italian due

NumeralEdit

  1. two
    Synonym: du

Etymology 2Edit

Compare Italian giù

AdverbEdit

  1. down, below