See also: ramé, ramë, raḿe, rámě, räme, and råme

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /reɪm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪm

Etymology 1 edit

From Northern Middle English ramen (to cry out, scream), from Old English *hrāmian, from Proto-West Germanic *hraimōn, from Proto-Germanic *hraimōną (to scream), *hraimaz (a scream), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kerey- (to scream, screech). Cognate with Old Norse hreimr (a scream, cry), and possibly to Old English hrēam (a cry, outcry, tumult, noise).

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

rame (uncountable)

  1. (Scotland) A remark or complaint repeated incessantly.
    • 1818, James Hogg, The Brownie of Bodsbeck:
      "Does he ever mention the king in his prayer?"
      "O yes: always."
      "What does he say about him?"
      "Something about the sceptre of righteousness, and the standard of truth. I ken he has some rhame about him."

Verb edit

rame (third-person singular simple present rames, present participle raming, simple past and past participle ramed)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland) To complain or cry incessantly.
    • 1936, J. G. Horne, Flooer o' the ling:
      The münelicht sea—It rugs at the he'rt o' me, An' rames an' rames eternally.
  2. (Northern England, Scotland) To talk nonsensically.
    • 1919, Thomas Manson, Humours of a Peat Commission:
      Yiss, ramin, ravin mad at Betty sood be abune her edder wan wye or da idder.

Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From French rame.

Noun edit

rame (plural rames)

  1. A branch.
    • 1886, Thomas Heney, Fortunate Days:
      Twice in thy pleasant year the wattles crown
      With golden down
      Their somber rames, and with the gums' stiff leaves
      A dusk-white fragrant bloom May interweaves

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

rame

  1. (dated or formal) singular present subjunctive of ramen

Anagrams edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From ramer.

Noun edit

rame f (plural rames)

  1. oar, paddle
    • 1836, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, chapter XXXIX, in Louis Viardot, transl., L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manche, volume I, Paris: J[acques]-J[ulien] Dubochet et Cie, éditeurs, [], →OCLC:
      Le fils de Barberousse était si cruel et traitait si mal ses captifs, que ceux qui occupaient les bancs de sa chiourme ne virent pas plutôt la galère la Louve se diriger sur eux et prendre de l’avance, qu’ils lâchèrent tous à la fois les rames, et saisirent leur capitaine, qui leur criait du gaillard d’arrière de ramer plus vite ; puis se le passant de banc en banc, de la poupe à la proue, ils lui donnèrent tant de coups de dents, qu’avant d’avoir atteint le mât, il avait rendu son âme aux enfers....
      The son of Barbarossa was so cruel and treated his captives so badly, that those who occupied the benches of his galley no sooner saw the galley la Louve steering to them and advancing, that they let go of the oars all at once, and seized their captain, who yelled to them from the aftcastle to row faster; then passing him to each other from bench to bench, from the poop to the prow, they bit him so much, that before having reached the mast, he had rendered his soul to Hell....
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Catalan raima.

Noun edit

rame f (plural rames)

  1. ream (of paper)
  2. train
Synonyms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Indonesian edit

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Noun edit

rame (first-person possessive rameku, second-person possessive ramemu, third-person possessive ramenya)

  1. hemp

Italian edit

 
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Chemical element
Cu
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Etymology edit

From Vulgar Latin *arāmen, variant of Late Latin aerāmen, derived from Latin aer-.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

rame m (uncountable)

  1. (chemistry) copper (metal)

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Albanian: ram[1]

References edit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998), “rem”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden; Boston; Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 367-8

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Noun edit

rāme

  1. vocative singular of rāmus

References edit

  • rame in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • rame”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Middle High German edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old High German rama f (support), from Proto-West Germanic *hramu (frame, support).

Noun edit

rame f

  1. frame

Descendants edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *ormę, cognate with Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Noun edit

rȁme n (Cyrillic spelling ра̏ме)

  1. shoulder

Declension edit

See also edit

Ternate edit

Etymology edit

From North Moluccan Malay rame, from Malay ramai. The noun may derive from N- (nominalizer) +‎ rame, which produces no change on the initial consonant.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

rame

  1. (stative) to be lively

Conjugation edit

Conjugation of rame
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st torame forame mirame
2nd norame nirame
3rd Masculine orame irame, yorame
Feminine morame
Neuter irame
- archaic

Noun edit

rame

  1. liveliness

References edit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh