See also: Ream and réam

English edit

 
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Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English reme, rem, from Old English rēam (cream), from Proto-West Germanic *raum, from Proto-Germanic *raumaz (cream), from Proto-Indo-European *réwgʰmn̥ (to sour [milk]).

Cognate with Dutch room (cream), German Rahm (cream), Norwegian rømme (sour cream), Icelandic rjómi (cream). See also ramekin.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

ream

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Cream; also, the creamlike froth on ale or other liquor; froth or foam in general.

Verb edit

ream (third-person singular simple present reams, present participle reaming, simple past and past participle reamed)

  1. (UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To cream; mantle; foam; froth.

Etymology 2 edit

Etymology uncertain, possibly a variant of rime (etymology 4).[1] Doublet of room.

Verb edit

ream (third-person singular simple present reams, present participle reaming, simple past and past participle reamed)

  1. (transitive) To enlarge (a hole), especially using a reamer; to bore (a hole) wider.
    Synonym: rime
  2. (transitive) To remove (material) by reaming.
  3. (transitive) To remove burrs and debris from inside (something, such as a freshly bored hole) using a tool.
    Synonym: rime
  4. To shape or form, especially using a reamer.
  5. (slang, vulgar, by extension from sense of enlarging a hole) To sexually penetrate in a rough and painful way.
  6. (slang) To yell at or berate.
    Synonym: ream out
Alternative forms edit
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle English reme, from Old French raime, rayme (ream) (French rame), from Arabicرِزْمَة(rizma, bundle).

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

ream (plural reams)

  1. A bundle, package, or quantity of paper, nowadays usually containing 500 sheets.
    Coordinate terms: bale, bundle, quire
  2. (chiefly in the plural) An abstract large amount of something.
    Synonyms: bunch, load, pile; see also Thesaurus:lot
    I can't go – I still have reams of work left.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ ream, v.4”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, September 2023; “ream2, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.

Anagrams edit

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

Probably from Latin regimen, regimine. Compare French royaume (Old French reaume, reiame), Occitan reialme, Romansh reginam.

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun edit

ream m (plural reams)

  1. kingdom

Related terms edit

Latin edit

Noun edit

ream f

  1. accusative singular of rea

Middle English edit

Noun edit

ream

  1. Alternative form of rem

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *raum, from Proto-Germanic *raumaz.

Cognate with Middle Low German rōm, Middle Dutch room, Old High German roum (German Rahm), Old Norse rjúmi (Icelandic rjómi, Norwegian rømme).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

rēam m

  1. cream

Descendants edit

  • English: ream

Scots edit

Etymology edit

Late Middle English, from Old English ream (cream).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ream (uncountable)

  1. (food): cream
  2. (ointment): cream