See also: récusé, récuse, and recusé

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French recuser, from Latin recūsō, recūsāre (I refuse, decline; I object to; I protest). The word ruse is possibly related to the aforementioned. See recusant. See more at cause, accuse, excuse.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪˈkjuːz/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

recuse (third-person singular simple present recuses, present participle recusing, simple past and past participle recused)

  1. (transitive) To refuse or reject (a judge); to declare that the judge shall not try the case or is disqualified from acting.
    The judge recused herself from that case, citing a possible conflict of interest.
  2. (intransitive, of a judge) To refuse to act as a judge; to declare oneself disqualified from acting.
    The judge recused from the case, citing a possible conflict of interest.

Usage notesEdit

  • Usex mention a judge, however this is not limiting. A prosecuting or defending official (police or legal) can also recuse themselves or be recused for conflict of interest, as can a member of a jury.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

recuse

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of recusar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of recusar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of recusar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of recusar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

recuse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of recusar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of recusar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of recusar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of recusar.