See also: récusé, récuse, and recusé

English edit

Etymology edit

From Late Middle English recusen,[1] from Old French recuser (modern French récuser (to challenge; to impugn; (formal) to make an objection; (law) to recuse), and from its etymon Latin recūsāre, the present active infinitive of recūsō (to decline, refuse, reject; (law) to object to, protest), from re- (prefix meaning ‘again’, denoting opposition or reversal) + causa (cause, reason; (law) case, claim; etc.) + (suffix forming regular first-conjugation verbs).[2] Doublet of rouse and possibly ruse.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

recuse (third-person singular simple present recuses, present participle recusing, simple past and past participle recused)

  1. (transitive, often reflexive)
    1. To reject or repudiate (an authority, a person, a court judgment, etc.).
      • [c. 1421, J. B., “XI. A Petition by J. B. (a Suspected Lollard) to King Henry V.”, in Cecil Munro, editor, Letters of Queen Margaret of Anjou and Bishop Beckington and Others. Written in the Reigns of Henry V. and Henry VI. [], London: [] [John Bowyer Nichols and Sons] for the Camden Society, published 1863, →OCLC, page 28:
        And therfore, if ayenst this peticion any processe be made of any maner Juge spirituel or temporell, and soo the same John have wronge, thanne he provoketh and appelleth this cause directly to the rightwisness of god and to the liege lorde, ffor other juges in his matere he hath utterly suspecte, for greet wronges that he hath had, dreding to have more. He therfor hem utterly recuseth, and herto he fully him submitteth.]
      • 1509–1547, John Strype, “[Appendix: [].] Numb[er] XXVI. Dr. Fox to Dr. Gardiner; Giving Him a Relation of His Reception at Court, upon His Return from His Embassy.”, in Ecclesiastical Memorials; Relating Chiefly to Religion, and the Reformation of It: Shewing the Various Emergencies of the Church of England, under King Henry the Eighth. [], volume I, London: [] John Wyat, [], published 1721, →OCLC, page 83:
        [T]he Quenys grace may alvvayes recuſe & appell at her good pleaſure & libertie, from vvhatſoever Decree or Sentence, either interlocutorie, or definitive, ſhe vvil: []
      1. (reflexive, law) Of a judge, juror, or prosecutor: to declare (oneself) unable to participate in a court case due to an actual or potential conflict of interest or lack of impartiality.
        The judge recused herself from that case, citing a possible conflict of interest as one of the parties was a personal friend.
      2. (chiefly Canada, US, law) To object to (a judge, juror, or prosecutor) participating in a court case due to an actual or potential conflict of interest or lack of impartiality.
        Synonym: (Philippines) inhibit
        • 1771, [John Shebbeare], An Authentic Narrative of the Oppressions of the Islanders of Jersey. [], volume II, London: [] S. Hooper, [], →OCLC, pages 238–239:
          The ſaid [Nicholas] Fiott, likevviſe, recuſeth James Pipon, eſq; [as being a judge in the cause] ſeeing, that he knovvs that the ſaid Fiott is the perſon vvho is the cauſe that the ſaid Pipon hath been ſued by rigour of lavv, before the council, in order to oblige him to do juſtice to the poor concerning the hoſpital.
    2. (obsolete)
      1. To refuse (to do something).
      2. (rare) To dismiss (an appeal).
        • 1529 July 3 (Gregorian calendar), Henry VIII, “[A Collection of Records and Original Papers; with Other Instruments Referred to in the Former History.] XXVIII. The King's Letter to His Ambassadours, about His Appearance before the Legates. An Original. June 23. 1529 [Julian calendar].”, in Gilbert Burnet, The History of the Reformation of the Church of England. The First Part, [], London: [] T[homas] H[odgkin] for Richard Chiswell, [], published 1679, →OCLC, page 78:
          [N]otvvithſtanding that the ſaid Judges amply and ſufficiently declared, as vvell the ſincerity of their minds directly, juſtly to proceed vvithout favour, dread, affection, or partiality; [] yet ſhe nevertheleſs perſiſting in her former vvilfulneſs, and in her Appeal, vvhich alſo by the ſaid Judges vvas likevviſe recuſed: []
  2. (intransitive, law) Of a judge, juror, or prosecutor: to declare oneself disqualified from trying a court case due to an actual or potential conflict of interest or lack of impartiality.
    The district attorney recused from the case because he used to work for the company which was the defendant.

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^ recūsen, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ recuse, v.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022; “recuse, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: re‧cu‧se

Verb edit

recuse

  1. inflection of recusar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /reˈkuse/ [reˈku.se]
  • Rhymes: -use
  • Syllabification: re‧cu‧se

Verb edit

recuse

  1. inflection of recusar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative