See also: Rend

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English renden, from Old English rendan (to rend, tear, cut, lacerate, cut down), from Proto-West Germanic *(h)randijan (to tear), of uncertain origin. Believed by some to be the causative of Proto-Germanic *hrindaną (to push), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱret-, *kret- (to hit, beat), which would make it related to Old English hrindan (to thrust, push). Cognate with Scots rent (to rend, tear), Old Frisian renda (to tear).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɹɛnd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

VerbEdit

rend (third-person singular simple present rends, present participle rending, simple past and past participle rent or rended)

  1. (transitive) To separate into parts with force or sudden violence; to split; to burst
    Powder rends a rock in blasting.
    Lightning rends an oak.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 1 scene 2
      If thou more murmur'st, I will rend an oak / And peg thee in his knotty entrails till / Thou hast howl'd away twelve winters.
    • 1970, Alvin Toffler, Future Shock, Bantam Books, pg. 317:
      We are most vulnerable now to the messages of the new subcults, to the claims and counterclaims that rend the air.
  2. (transitive) To part or tear off forcibly; to take away by force; to amputate.
    • 1611, King James Version, Job 1:12:
      And when they lifted up their eyes afar off, and knew him not, they lifted up their voice, and wept; and they rent every one his mantle, and sprinkled dust upon their heads toward heaven.
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, chapter 51, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299, page 260:
      For a time, there reigned, too, a sense of peculiar dread at this flitting apparition, as if it were treacherously beckoning us on and on, in order that the monster might turn round upon us, and rend us at last in the remotest and most savage seas.
  3. (intransitive) To be rent or torn; to become parted; to separate; to split.
    Relationships may rend if tempers flare.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

rend (plural rends)

  1. A violent separation of parts.
    • 2002, John S. Anderson, A Daughter of Light (page xvi)
      She'd been in a couple of minor car accidents herself, and witnessed a few others, and the rend of metal was unforgettable.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

An early loanword from a South Slavic language, from Proto-Slavic *rędъ (row, line) with a preserved nasal.[1][2] Compare Old Church Slavonic рѧдъ (rędŭ, line, order), Serbo-Croatian red (row), Bulgarian ред (red, row), and West Slavic descendant Polish rząd (row).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rend m (indefinite plural rende, definite singular rendi, definite plural rendet)

  1. row, order, line
  2. turn
  3. class, category

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Albanian *renta, from *rena, akin to Gothic 𐍂𐌹𐌽𐌽𐌰𐌽 (rinnan) and Old Norse rinna (to run).[3]

VerbEdit

rend (first-person singular past tense renda, participle rendur)

  1. to run (after), hurry (after)
    Synonym: gjëmoj

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “rend”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 368
  2. ^ Omari, Anila (2012), "rend", in Marrëdhëniet gjuhësore shqiptaro-serbe, Tirana, Albania: Kristalina KH, page 250-251
  3. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “rend”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 386

DanishEdit

VerbEdit

rend

  1. imperative of rende

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rend

  1. third-person singular present indicative of rendre

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from a Slavic language. Ultimately from Proto-Slavic *rędъ. Compare Serbo-Croatian rȇd.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rend (plural rendek)

  1. order (the state of being well-arranged)
  2. order (conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet)
  3. order (a group of religious adherents, especially monks or nuns, set apart within their religion by adherence to a particular rule or set of principles)
    Synonym: szerzetesrend
  4. order (an association of knights)
    Synonym: lovagrend
  5. (biology, taxonomy) order (a category in the classification of organisms, ranking below class and above family; a taxon at that rank)
    Coordinate terms: törzs, osztály, család, nemzetség, faj
  6. (historical) estate (a major social class or order of persons regarded collectively as part of the body politic of the country and formerly possessing distinct political rights (Estates of the realm))

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative rend rendek
accusative rendet rendeket
dative rendnek rendeknek
instrumental renddel rendekkel
causal-final rendért rendekért
translative renddé rendekké
terminative rendig rendekig
essive-formal rendként rendekként
essive-modal
inessive rendben rendekben
superessive renden rendeken
adessive rendnél rendeknél
illative rendbe rendekbe
sublative rendre rendekre
allative rendhez rendekhez
elative rendből rendekből
delative rendről rendekről
ablative rendtől rendektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
rendé rendeké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
rendéi rendekéi
Possessive forms of rend
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. rendem rendjeim
2nd person sing. rended rendjeid
3rd person sing. rendje rendjei
1st person plural rendünk rendjeink
2nd person plural rendetek rendjeitek
3rd person plural rendjük rendjeik

Derived termsEdit

Compound words with this term at the beginning
Compound words with this term at the end

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ rend in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further readingEdit

  • rend in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN