See also: Interior and interiør

English edit

Etymology edit

From Latin interior (inner, interior).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

interior (not comparable)

  1. Within any limits, enclosure, or substance; inside; internal; inner.
    the interior apartments of a house; the interior surface of a hollow ball
  2. Remote from the limits, frontier, or shore; inland.
    the interior parts of a region or country

Alternative forms edit

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun edit

interior (plural interiors)

  1. The inside of a building, container, cavern, or other enclosed structure.
    The gardens are just divine, but the interior of the house are even more splendid.
  2. The inside regions of a country, distanced from the borders or coasts.
    Sir Richard Burton explored far into the African interior.
  3. (mathematics, topology) The set of all interior points of a set.

Antonyms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Asturian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin interior.

Noun edit

interior m (plural interiores)

  1. interior (the inside of an enclosed structure)
    Antonym: exterior

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin interiōrem.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

interior m or f (masculine and feminine plural interiors)

  1. interior, inner, internal
    Antonym: exterior

Noun edit

interior m (plural interiors)

  1. interior, inside
    Antonym: exterior

Further reading edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

From Latin interior.

Adjective edit

interior m or f (plural interiores)

  1. inner, interior

Noun edit

interior m (plural interiores)

  1. interior

Antonyms edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From the earlier *interus (whence also intrā), from the Proto-Indo-European *h₁énteros (inner, what is inside). Cognates include the Sanskrit अन्तर (ántara, interior) and the Ancient Greek ἔντερον (énteron, intestine, bowel).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

interior (neuter interius); third declension

  1. comparative degree of inter
    1. inner, interior
    2. nearer

Usage notes edit

Although this adjective is the comparative form of inter, there is no positive form. The word inter is an adverb and preposition, not an adjective.

Declension edit

Third-declension comparative adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative interior interius interiōrēs interiōra
Genitive interiōris interiōrum
Dative interiōrī interiōribus
Accusative interiōrem interius interiōrēs interiōra
Ablative interiōre interiōribus
Vocative interior interius interiōrēs interiōra

Descendants edit

References edit

  • interior”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • interior”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • interior in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the interior of Asia: interior Asia; interiora Asiae
    • profound scientific education: litterae interiores et reconditae, artes reconditae

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin interiōrem.

Pronunciation edit

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ĩ.te.ɾiˈoʁ/ [ĩ.te.ɾɪˈoh], (faster pronunciation) /ĩ.teˈɾjoʁ/ [ĩ.teˈɾjoh]
    • (São Paulo) IPA(key): /ĩ.te.ɾiˈoɾ/ [ĩ.te.ɾɪˈoɾ], (faster pronunciation) /ĩ.teˈɾjoɾ/
    • (Rio de Janeiro) IPA(key): /ĩ.te.ɾiˈoʁ/ [ĩ.te.ɾɪˈoχ], (faster pronunciation) /ĩ.teˈɾjoʁ/ [ĩ.teˈɾjoχ]
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /ĩ.te.ɾiˈoɻ/ [ĩ.te.ɾɪˈoɻ], (faster pronunciation) /ĩ.teˈɾjoɻ/
 
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ĩ.tɨˈɾjoɾ/, (with ellision) /ĩ.tɾiˈoɾ/, (with ellision, faster pronunciation) /ĩˈtɾjoɾ/, /ẽ.tɨˈɾjoɾ/, (with ellision) /ẽ.tɾiˈoɾ/, (with ellision, faster pronunciation) /ẽˈtɾjoɾ/
    • (Southern Portugal) IPA(key): /ĩ.tɨˈɾjo.ɾi/, (with ellision) /ĩ.tɾiˈo.ɾi/, (with ellision, faster pronunciation) /ĩˈtɾjo.ɾi/, /ẽ.tɨˈɾjo.ɾi/, (with ellision) /ẽ.tɾiˈo.ɾi/, (with ellision, faster pronunciation) /ẽˈtɾjo.ɾi/

  • Hyphenation: in‧te‧ri‧or

Adjective edit

interior m or f (plural interiores)

  1. inner; interior (located in the inside)
    Antonym: exterior
    Não comemos os olhos nem os órgãos interiores.
    We don’t eat the eyes nor the inner organs.

Noun edit

interior m (plural interiores)

  1. interior; inside
    Antonym: exterior
    Tirei uma bola do interior da caixa.
    I took out a ball from interior the box.
  2. country; countryside; interior (regions outside major cities)
    Synonym: campo
    Antonym: cidade
    Esses fazendeiros moraram sempre no interior.
    Those farmers have always lived in the country.

Usage notes edit

Generally speaking, any part of a Brazilian state that is not in or near its capital or coast is the state's interior. Alternatively, people from smaller cities tend to consider only smaller towns interior, those from small villages tend to consider only places without any collective settlement interior, and so on.

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French intérieur.

Noun edit

interior n (plural interiori)

  1. interior

Declension edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

From Latin interior.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /inteˈɾjoɾ/ [ĩn̪.t̪eˈɾjoɾ]
  • Rhymes: -oɾ
  • Syllabification: in‧te‧rior

Adjective edit

interior m or f (masculine and feminine plural interiores)

  1. inner, interior

Noun edit

interior m (plural interiores)

  1. interior
  2. (Venezuela, also used in the plural) male underwear, underpants

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit