sans

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sans, borrowed from Old French sans, senz, sens, from Latin sine ‎(without) conflated with absēns ‎(absent, remote).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

sans

  1. without, lacking
    • 1590, William Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost, act v, scene 2 (First Folio ed.)
      Ber. [] And to begin Wench, ſo God helpe me law,
      My loue to thee is ſound, ſans cracke or flaw.
      Roſa. Sans, ſans, I pray you.
    • 1982, Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 766:
      Those with brooms started to sweep literally, at the feet of the crowd, driving it back into the side streets from which it had emerged to form this assembly – now riders sans steeds.
    • 1991, A. R. Morlan, The Amulet‎, page 212
      But regardless of when Wally had parked himself out in that backyard—sans coat or jacket—somehow, the old lady must have known where Wally would be before he drove out to the Isaacs trailer—or else she followed him out there from his house.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sans ‎(not comparable)

  1. (typography) short for sans serif.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

sans

  1. plural of san

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sans, senz sens, from Latin sine conflated with absentia in the sense "without". Near Cognates include Spanish sin, Portuguese sem, Italian senza, Catalan sens, sense

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

sans

  1. without

External linksEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French senz.

PrepositionEdit

sans

  1. without

DescendantsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sans, senz, sens, from Latin sine conflated with absentia in the sense "without".

PrepositionEdit

sans

  1. (Jersey) without

AntonymsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sensus, via French sens

NounEdit

sans m ‎(definite singular sansen, indefinite plural sanser, definite plural sansene)

  1. sense

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sensus, via French sens

NounEdit

sans m ‎(definite singular sansen, indefinite plural sansar, definite plural sansane)

  1. sense

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

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