See also: Sens, séns, and Sens.

English edit

Noun edit

sens

  1. plural of sen

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “from German?”)

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

sens (plural sense)

  1. scythe
    Synonym: seis

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

sens

  1. Archaic form of sense (without).

Usage notes edit

  • This preposition has been superseded in all dialects by the form sense. Sens is nowadays only used in poetry (for metrical reasons or for a deliberately archaizing effect), and in common set phrases: sens dubte (without a doubt) and sens falta (without fail).

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

French edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Middle French, from Old French sens, sen, san (sense, reason, direction), partly borrowed from Latin sēnsus (sense, sensation, feeling, meaning), from sentiō (feel, perceive); partly from Frankish *sinn (sense, reason, mental faculty, way, direction) (via Vulgar Latin *sennus), from Proto-West Germanic *sinn (mind, meaning), particularly in the sense of "direction". Both Latin and Germanic from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel). Compare also French assener (to thrust out), forcené (maniac). More at send.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sens m (plural sens)

  1. meaning, sense
    Synonym: signification
    le sens ultime de la viethe ultimate meaning of life
    Les mots ont un sens.Words have meanings.
  2. sense, sensation
    Synonyms: perception, sensation
  3. sense, intelligence
    bon senscommon sense
    Je préfère fréquenter ceux qui manquent de bon sens.
    I prefer to associate with people who lack common sense.
  4. direction of circulation
    voie à sens uniqueone-way street, one-way road
    en tous sens, dans tous les sensin all directions
Derived terms edit
With this term at the beginning
With this term at the end
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

sens

  1. inflection of sentir:
    1. first/second-person singular indicative present
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading edit

Latgalian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *senas. Cognates include Latvian sens and Lithuanian senas.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈsʲɛnt͡s]
  • Hyphenation: sens

Adjective edit

sens

  1. ancient

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • M. Bukšs, J. Placinskis (1973) Latgaļu volūdas gramatika un pareizraksteibas vōrdneica, Latgaļu izdevnīceiba, page 397

Latvian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *senas, from Proto-Indo-European *sénos (old). In Latvian, apparently only the adverbial form sen was conserved without interruption; in the first Latvian dictionaries, only vecs is consistently given as an adjective, whereas the occurrences of sens are few and dubious. Apparently the Latvian adjectival form of sen fell out of usage after Proto-Balto-Slavic times, and was recoined and successfully reintroduced only in the 19th century. Cognates include Lithuanian sẽnas (old, ancient), Sudovian sens (old), Old Irish sen, Gothic 𐍃𐌹𐌽𐌴𐌹𐌲𐍃 (sineigs) (< *sen-ei-), Sanskrit सन (sana, old), Ancient Greek ἕνος (hénos, old, last year's), Latin senex (old in age, senior).[1]

Adjective edit

sens (definite senais, comparative senāks, superlative vissenākais, adverb sen)

  1. ancient, old, of long ago (many years, centuries, ages ago; the people of such times, their institutions, culture, etc.)
    seni laiki, tāla pagatneancient times, distant past
    senā Grieķijaancient Greece
    senā Romaancient Rome
    sens rokrakstsancient manuscript
    sena tradīcijaancient tradition
    sena valodaancient language
    sens darbarīksancient tool
    seni augi, dzīvniekiancient plants, animals
    senie latviešithe ancient Latvians
    senie eģiptiešithe ancient Egyptians
    sena ciltsancient tribe
  2. old (from relatively long ago; separated from the present by a (subjectively) significant amount of time)
    sena skolasbiedru draudzībaan old schoolmate friendship
    sens paziņaan old acquaintance
    piedzīvojumu žanrs kinomākslā ir sens un pārbaudītsthe adventure genre in film is old and tried

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992) “sens”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN

Middle French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French sens.

Noun edit

sens m (plural sens)

  1. sense (method for a living being to gather data about the world)
  2. sense (ability to reason)

Descendants edit

  • French: sens

Occitan edit

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

sens

  1. (Gascony, Languedoc, Limousin) Alternative form of sense[1]

Noun edit

sens m (plural sens)

  1. (Gascony, Languedoc) sense[2][3]

References edit

  1. ^ Diccionari General de la Lenga Occitana, L’Academia occitana – Consistòri del Gai Saber, 2008-2024, page 556.
  2. ^ Patric Guilhemjoan, Diccionari elementari occitan-francés francés-occitan (gascon), 2005, Orthez, per noste, 2005, →ISBN, page 123.
  3. ^ Diccionari General de la Lenga Occitana, L’Academia occitana – Consistòri del Gai Saber, 2008-2024, page 556.
  • Patric Guilhemjoan, Diccionari elementari occitan-francés francés-occitan (gascon), 2005, Orthez, per noste, 2005, →ISBN,page 124.

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Partly borrowed from Latin sensus (sense, sensation, feeling, meaning), from sentiō (feel, perceive); partly (via Vulgar Latin *sennus) from Frankish *sinn (sense, mental faculty, way, direction). Both Latin and Germanic from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel). More at sens.

Noun edit

sens oblique singularm (oblique plural sens, nominative singular sens, nominative plural sens)

  1. reason; ability to reason or think

Synonyms edit

Descendants edit

Old Irish edit

Noun edit

sens m

  1. Alternative spelling of séns: alternative form of síans

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
sens ṡens unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Polish edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin sensus.[1][2] First attested in 1461–1467.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (10th–15th CE) /sɛns/
  • IPA(key): (15th CE) /sɛns/

Noun edit

sens m inan

  1. reason (ability to reason)
    • 1461-1467, Sermones. Rękopiśmienne ekscerpty pochodzące z rkpsu Archiwum i Biblioteki Krakowskiej Kapituły Katedralnej o sygn. 230 (dawna sygn. 1421/108 Mns) z roku 1461-1467, page 349r:
      In verbo proposito proponitur fides nostra quoad articulum resurectionis probata per sensum, doswyathczona przesz sens, rata per consensum
      [In verbo proposito proponitur fides nostra quoad articulum resurectionis probata per sensum, doświadczona przez sens, rata per consensum]

Descendants edit

References edit

  1. ^ Stanisław Dubisz, editor (2003), “sens”, in Uniwersalny słownik języka polskiego [Universal dictionary of the Polish language]‎[1] (in Polish), volumes 1-4, Warsaw: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN SA, →ISBN
  2. ^ Witold Doroszewski, editor (1958–1969), “sens”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), Warszawa: PWN

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish sens.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sens m inan

  1. sense (meaning, reason, or value of something)
  2. point (purpose or objective, which makes something meaningful)
    Near-synonym: znaczenie
  3. (obsolete) thought; aphorism

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjectives
adverbs
particles
nouns

Trivia edit

According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), sens is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 18 times in scientific texts, 1 time in news, 26 times in essays, 18 times in fiction, and 32 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 95 times, making it the 667th most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[1]

References edit

  1. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990) “sens”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language]‎[2] (in Polish), volume 2, Kraków, Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 523

Further reading edit

  • sens in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sens in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • Maria Renata Mayenowa, Stanisław Rospond, Witold Taszycki, Stefan Hrabec, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz (2010-2023) “sens”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish]
  • SENS”, in Elektroniczny Słownik Języka Polskiego XVII i XVIII Wieku [Electronic Dictionary of the Polish Language of the XVII and XVIII Century], 24.10.2008
  • Samuel Bogumił Linde (1807–1814) “sens”, in Słownik języka polskiego[3]
  • Aleksander Zdanowicz (1861) “sens”, in Słownik języka polskiego, Wilno 1861[4]
  • J. Karłowicz, A. Kryński, W. Niedźwiedzki, editors (1915), “sens”, in Słownik języka polskiego[5] (in Polish), volume 6, Warsaw, page 65

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French sens, Latin sensus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sens n (plural sensuri)

  1. sense, meaning
  2. reason, logic
  3. direction

Sudovian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *senas, from Proto-Indo-European *sénos. Compare Lithuanian sẽnas (old), Latvian sȩns (ancient); however, Latvian vȩcs (old), Old Prussian urs (old).[1][2]

Adjective edit

ſenſ

  1. old
    Antonyms: iauniſ (young), nau (new)

References edit

  1. ^ Zigmas Zinkevičius (1985) “Lenkų-jotvingių žodynėlis? [A Polish-Yotvingian dictionary?]”, in Baltistica, volume 21, number 1 (in Lithuanian), Vilnius: VU, →DOI, page 78:ſenſ ‘senas, l. stary’ 171.
  2. ^ sẽnas” in Hock et al., Altlitauisches etymologisches Wörterbuch 2.0 (online, 2020–): “nar. ſenſ adj. ‘alt’”.