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See also: Sens, séns, and Sens.

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

sens

  1. plural of sen

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PrepositionEdit

sens

  1. Alternative form of sense

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French, from Old French sens, sen, san (sense, reason, direction), partly from Latin sensus (sense, sensation, feeling, meaning), from sentiō (feel, perceive); partly from Frankish *sinn (sense, reason, mental faculty, way, direction), from Proto-Germanic *sinnaz (mind, meaning). Both Latin and Germanic from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel). Compare also French assener (to thrust out), forcené (maniac). More at send.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sens m (plural sens)

  1. sense
  2. meaning
  3. direction
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From sentir.

PronunciationEdit

  • /sɑ̃/

VerbEdit

sens

  1. first-person singular indicative present of sentir
  2. second-person singular indicative present of sentir
  3. second-person singular imperative of sentir

Further readingEdit


LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *senas, from Proto-Indo-European *sénos (old). In Latvian, apparently only the adverbial form sen was conserved without interruption; in the first Latvian dictionaries, only vecs is consistently given as an adjective, whereas the occurrences of sens are few and dubious. Apparently the Latvian adjectival form of sen fell out of usage after Proto-Balto-Slavic times, and was recoined and successfully reintroduced only in the 19th century. Cognates include Lithuanian sẽnas (old, ancient), Sudovian sens (old), Old Irish sen, Gothic 𐍃𐌹𐌽𐌴𐌹𐌲𐍃 (sineigs) (< *sen-ei-), Sanskrit सनः (sánaḥ, old), Ancient Greek ἕνος (hénos, old, last year's), Latin senex (old in age, senior).[1]

AdjectiveEdit

sens (definite senais, comparative senāks, superlative vissenākais, adverb sen)

  1. ancient, old, of long ago (many years, centuries, ages ago; the people of such times, their institutions, culture, etc.)
    seni laiki, tāla pagatneancient times, distant past
    senā Grieķijaancient Greece
    senā Romaancient Rome
    sens rokrakstsancient manuscript
    sena tradīcijaancient tradition
    sena valodaancient language
    sens darbarīksancient tool
    seni augi, dzīvniekiancient plants, animals
    senie latviešithe ancient Latvians
    senie eģiptiešithe ancient Egyptians
    sena ciltsancient tribe
  2. old (from relatively long ago; separated from the present by a (subjectively) significant amount of time)
    sena skolasbiedru draudzībaan old schoolmate friendship
    sens paziņaan old acquaintance
    piedzīvojumu žanrs kinomākslā ir sens un pārbaudītsthe adventure genre in film is old and tried

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “sens”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN 9984-700-12-7

Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sens m (plural sens)

  1. sense (method for a living being to gather data about the world)
  2. sense (ability to reason)

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Partly from Latin sensus (sense, sensation, feeling, meaning), from sentiō (feel, perceive); partly from Frankish *sinn (sense, mental faculty, way, direction), from Proto-Germanic *sinnaz (mind, meaning). Both Latin and Germanic from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel). More at sens.

NounEdit

sens m (oblique plural sens, nominative singular sens, nominative plural sens)

  1. reason; ability to reason or think

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sens m inan

  1. sense (meaning or reason)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • sens in Polish dictionaries at PWN