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 sheath on Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English s(c)heth(e), from Old English scēaþ, from Proto-Germanic *skaiþiz, possibly from a root skaiþ- ("split, divide"), related to *skaiþaną (separate). Cognate with Dutch schede, Low German scheed, German Scheide, Danish skede, Norwegian skjede, Icelandic skeið.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: shēth, IPA(key): /ʃiːθ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːθ

NounEdit

sheath (plural sheaths)

  1. A scabbard; a holster for a sword.
  2. Anything that has a similar shape to a scabbard for a sword that is for the purpose of holding an object that is longer than it is wide; a case.
  3. The insulating outer cover of an electrical cable.
  4. A tight-fitting dress.
  5. (Britain) A condom.
  6. The foreskin of certain animals, e.g. dogs and horses.
  7. The base of a leaf when sheathing or investing a stem or branch, as in grasses.
  8. One of the elytra of an insect.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sheath (third-person singular simple present sheaths, present participle sheathing, simple past and past participle sheathed)

  1. To put an object (especially a weapon, in particular, a sword) into its sheath.
    • John Dryden, The Hind and the Panther
      But when his foe lies prostrate on the plain, / He sheaths his paws, uncurls his angry mane, / And pleased with bloodless honours of the day, / Walks over and disdains th' inglorious prey.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit

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