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CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From es +‎ sigue, from es +‎ seguir, from Vulgar Latin *sequire, remodelled from Latin sequī, present active infinitive of sequor.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: si‧ge

AdverbEdit

sige

  1. always
  2. OK

InterjectionEdit

sige

  1. OK

DanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Danish sighæ, sæghiæ, from Old Norse segja, from Proto-Germanic *sagjaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ-.

VerbEdit

sige (imperative sig, infinitive at sige, present tense siger, past tense sagde, perfect tense har sagt)

  1. to say
  2. to tell
  3. to mean

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

sige

  1. Alternative form of siȝe

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse siga

VerbEdit

sige (imperative sig, present tense siger, passive siges, simple past seg or seig, past participle seget, present participle sigende)

  1. to sag, sink, slide
  2. to ooze, seep, trickle
  3. to move slowly, drift, glide

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

sige (imperative sig, present tense sig, simple past seig, past participle sige, present participle sigande)

  1. Alternative form of siga

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *segaz (victory), from Proto-Indo-European *segʰ-. Akin to Old Frisian sige (victory), Old Saxon sigi (Middle Low German sege), Dutch zege, Old High German sigi, sigu (German Sieg), Old Norse sigr (Danish sejr, old spelling before the writing reform of 1948 Seier, Swedish seger), Gothic 𐍃𐌹𐌲𐌹𐍃 (sigis), Sanskrit सहस् (sáhas) - power, victory, Avestan 𐬵𐬀𐬰𐬀𐬥𐬵(hazanh, power, victory)[1].

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

siġe m (nominative plural siġas)

  1. victory, success

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: siȝe, sige, sy

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Etymology of sigu (Old High German)

TagalogEdit

InterjectionEdit

sige

  1. OK
  2. continue