starter

See also: Starter

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

start +‎ -er

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈstɑːtə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈstɑɹtɚ/, [ˈstɑɹɾɚ]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)tə(ɹ)

NounEdit

starter (plural starters)

  1. Someone who starts, or who starts something.
    • 1982, Hugh Stephenson, Claret and Chips: The Rise of the SDP (page 158)
      The most charitable view taken of them by their colleagues was that, as late starters on the journey away from their Labour past, they had not fully understood that the SDP intended to be something new and not just a Mark II Labour Party []
    1. The person who starts a race by firing a gun or waving a flag.
    2. (baseball) A starting pitcher.
    3. (golf) A person employed to take new players to the first tee at suitable intervals, and to provide them with caddies and equipment.
  2. Something that starts something.
    1. An electric motor that starts an internal combustion engine.
    2. A device that initiates the flow of high voltage electricity in a fluorescent lamp.
    3. A yeast culture used to start a fermentation process.
  3. Something with which to begin; a first property, etc.
    It's small, but it's a good starter house.
  4. The first course of a meal, consisting of a small, usually savoury, dish.
    Synonyms: entrée, hors d'oeuvre, appetizer
    Coordinate terms: main, main course, dessert
  5. (team sports) A player in the lineup of players that a team fields at the beginning of a game.
  6. A dog that rouses game.
  7. (historical, Britain) A short length of rope formerly used for casual chastisement in the Navy.
  8. (rail transport) A railway signal controlling the starting of trains from a station or some other location, more fully called a starter signal or starting signal.
    • 1961 March, “The new Glasgow Central signalbox”, in Trains Illustrated, page 179:
      The colour-light signals admitting directly to the platforms and the inner starters (for short-length departures well up the platforms) are two-aspect, while those immediately beyond them are three-aspect, but elsewhere four-aspect signals have been installed in association with route indicators.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

starter c (singular definite starteren, plural indefinite startere)

  1. starter

InflectionEdit

NounEdit

starter c

  1. indefinite plural of start

VerbEdit

starter

  1. present of starte

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From starten +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɑr.tər/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: star‧ter

NounEdit

starter m (plural starters, diminutive startertje n)

  1. starter, one who starts; in particular
    1. first-time home buyer
    2. start-up

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English starter.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

starter m (plural starters)

  1. starter (person or device)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English start.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

starter

  1. (Canada) Synonym of démarrer
ConjugationEdit

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English starter.

NounEdit

starter m (invariable)

  1. starter (sports; car engine)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

starter m

  1. indefinite plural of start

Etymology 2Edit

From starte +‎ -er

NounEdit

starter m (definite singular starteren, indefinite plural startere, definite plural starterne)

  1. a starter (person who gives a starting signal)
  2. a starter (starter motor)
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

starter

  1. present tense of starte

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French starter.

NounEdit

starter n (plural starteri)

  1. starter

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English starter.

NounEdit

starter m (Cyrillic spelling стартер)

  1. A device that starts an engine or a machine.

SynonymsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

starter

  1. indefinite plural of start

AnagramsEdit