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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

stog (third-person singular simple present stog, present participle stogging, simple past and past participle stogged)

  1. (dated, used in passive) To bog down; to cause to be stuck in mud.
    • 1855, Charles Kingsley, chapter 5, in Westward Ho!:
      If any of his party are mad, they'll try it, and be stogged till the day of judgment. There are bogs..twenty feet deep.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To walk with a heavy or clumsy gait; to plod.
  3. (dialectal, Scotland) To stab; to probe; to thrust
    Synonyms: prod, pierce
  4. (Britain, dialectal) To probe a pool with a pole.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

stog (third-person singular simple present stog, present participle stogging, simple past and past participle stogged)

  1. (dialectal, California) To smoke a cigarette.

AnagramsEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

 
stog

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *stogъ, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teg- (to cover). Cognate with Upper Sorbian stóh, Polish stóg, Czech stoh, Old Church Slavonic стогъ (stogŭ), and Russian стог (stog).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stog m (diminutive stožk)

  1. haystack

DeclensionEdit


ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

stog

  1. to stab, probe, thrust, prod, pierce

NounEdit

stog (plural stogs)

  1. stab, thrust
  2. thorn

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *stogъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stȏg m (Cyrillic spelling сто̑г)

  1. stack (of hay, also in computing)

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • stog” in Hrvatski jezični portal

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the common pronunciation with g instead of d at the end.

VerbEdit

stog

  1. Misspelling of stod.

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

stog (nominative plural stogs)

  1. stocking

DeclensionEdit