See also: Taw and TAw

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tawen, from Old English tawian (to do, make), from Proto-Germanic *tawjaną (to make, prepare), from Proto-Indo-European *dewh₂- (to tie to, secure).

Cognate with Dutch touwen (to rope, tether, curry), Dutch tuien (to fasten with ropes), German Tau (rope, hawser, cable), Gothic 𐍄𐌰𐌿𐌾𐌰𐌽 (taujan, to make, prepare). Related to tool and tether.

VerbEdit

taw (third-person singular simple present taws, present participle tawing, simple past and past participle tawed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To prepare or dress, as hemp, by beating; to tew.
  2. (transitive, by extension) To beat; to scourge.
  3. (transitive) To dress and prepare, as the skins of sheep, lambs, goats, and kids, for gloves, etc., by imbuing them with alum, salt, and other agents, for softening and bleaching them.
    1. (transitive) To turn (animals' hide) into leather, usually by soaking it in a certain solution.
Related termsEdit

NounEdit

taw

  1. (obsolete) Tawed leather.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown.

NounEdit

taw (plural taws)

  1. A favorite marble in the game of marbles.
    • 1922 , James Joyce, Ulysses, chapter V:[1]
      Near the timberyard a squatted child at marbles, alone, shooting the taw with a cunnythumb.
  2. A line or mark from which the players begin a game of marbles.
  3. (square dancing) A dance partner.
    Walk around your corner; see-saw around your taw.
  4. A favorite person; beloved, partner, spouse.

VerbEdit

taw (third-person singular simple present taws, present participle tawing, simple past and past participle tawed)

  1. To shoot a marble.

Etymology 3Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

taw (plural taws)

  1. The 22nd and last letter of many Semitic alphabets/abjads, including Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew, Syriac, and Arabic.
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Compare tew (to tow), and tow.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

taw (third-person singular simple present taws, present participle tawing, simple past and past participle tawed)

  1. To push; to tug; to tow.
    • 1630, Michael Drayton, The Muses' Elizium:
      Swans vpon the Streame to tawe me

ReferencesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

AnagramsEdit


Ili TurkiEdit

NounEdit

taw

  1. mountain

ReferencesEdit

  • Zhào Xiāngrú and Reinhard F. Hahn (1989). "The Ili Turk People and Their Language". Central Asiatic Journal.

MaguindanaoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to Tagalog tao.

NounEdit

taw

  1. a person

MaranaoEdit

NounEdit

taw

  1. a person, a man or a woman, a human

TatarEdit

NounEdit

taw

  1. mountain

WelshEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Celtic *tāti (to be (stative)) (compare Old Irish at·tá, Irish ), from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂- (to stand).

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

taw

  1. (South Wales) that (introduces a noun clause, marking it for emphasis)
    • 1990, Y Faner, p. 8[1]:
      Gadewch imi ddatgan taw gwaith caled fydd y cyfan.
      Let me declare that hard work it will all be.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Celtic *tawsos (silent), from Proto-Indo-European *teh₂ws- (still, silent) (compare Sanskrit तूष्णीम् (tūṣṇīm, silently)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

taw m (uncountable)

  1. silence
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

taw

  1. second-person singular imperative of tewi

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
taw daw nhaw thaw
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Thorne, David A. (1993) A Comprehensive Welsh Grammar (Reference Grammars), Oxford and Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, →ISBN, § 353 B, page 377

WolofEdit

VerbEdit

taw

  1. to rain