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See also: traïr

Contents

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin trādere, present active infinitive of trādō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trair (first-person singular present traeixo, past participle traït)

  1. to betray

ConjugationEdit

as servir, except that unaccented i in the endings, immediately following the stem u, takes a diaresis

Related termsEdit


ElfdalianEdit

Elfdalian cardinal numbers
 <  2 3 4  > 
    Cardinal : trair

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þrír, from Proto-Germanic *þrīz. Cognate with Swedish tre.

NumeralEdit

trair

  1. (cardinal) three

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • traïr (diaereses are not universally used in transcriptions of Old French)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin trādere, present active infinitive of trādō.

VerbEdit

trair

  1. to betray; to commit treason
    • circa 1170, Wace, Le Roman de Rou:
      Ne dote mie Richart que li Roiz le traïst
      Richard didn't doubt that the King was betraying him

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese traer, from Latin trādere, present active infinitive of trādō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

trair (first-person singular present indicative traio, past participle traído)

  1. to betray
  2. to be unfaithful

ConjugationEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter) trer
  • (Vallader) trar

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *tragō, *tragere, from Latin trahō, trahere (pull).

VerbEdit

trair

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) to pull

Derived termsEdit