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AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirō, tirāre, from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear, tear away, rip or snatch off, pull violently, tug) (through Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (*tiran)), from Proto-Indo-European *der- (to tear, tear apart). Alternatively Late Latin *martyrāre, possibly with influence from Latin trahō. Compare French tirer, Italian tirare.

VerbEdit

tirar (first-person singular indicative present tiro, past participle tiráu)

  1. to throw (to cause an object to move rapidly through the air)
  2. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

ConjugationEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirō, tirāre, from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear, tear away, rip or snatch off, pull violently, tug) (through Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (*tiran)), from Proto-Indo-European *der- (to tear, tear apart). Alternatively Late Latin *martyrāre, possibly with influence from Latin trahō. Compare French tirer, Italian tirare.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tirar (first-person singular present tiro, past participle tirat)

  1. to throw, cast
  2. to shoot, fire

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Esperanto tiri, French tirer, Italian tirare, Spanish tirar.

VerbEdit

tirar (present tense tiras, past tense tiris, future tense tiros, imperative tirez, conditional tirus)

  1. (transitive) to pull, draw, tug
  2. (transitive, of chimneys) to draw

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

tirar

  1. apocopic form of tirare

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese tirar, from Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirō, tirāre, of unknown or uncertain etymology. Possibly from Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (*tiran), from Proto-Germanic *teraną or alternatively Late Latin *martyrāre, possibly with influence from Latin trahō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tirar (first-person singular present indicative tiro, past participle tirado)

  1. to take, take out, take away
  2. to remove, withdraw
  3. (reflexive, São Paulo city, slang) to mock; ridicule

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:tirar.

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirō, tirāre, of unknown or uncertain etymology. Possibly from Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (*tiran), from Proto-Germanic *teraną or alternatively Late Latin *martyrāre, possibly with influence from Latin trahō.

VerbEdit

tirar (first-person singular present tiro, first-person singular preterite tiré, past participle tirado)

  1. (transitive) to throw
  2. (transitive) to throw out
  3. (transitive) to shoot; to launch
  4. (transitive) to take (a photograph)
  5. (transitive) to print
  6. (transitive) to knock over; to knock down
  7. (Spain, vulgar, prepositional, takes a reflexive pronoun) to fuck
  8. (intransitive) to pull
  9. (intransitive) to shoot
  10. (intransitive) to manage; to get by
    tiramos, es difícil, pero tiramoswe get by, it is hard, but we get by
  11. (intransitive) to attract
    tirar a(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  12. (intransitive) to be somewhat
    tira a lastimait is a bit sad
    tirarse(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  13. (reflexive) to throw oneself
  14. (reflexive, colloquial) to spend time, hang out

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the templates {{syn|es|...}} or {{ant|es|...}} to add them to the appropriate sense(s).

Related termsEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin, from Vulgar Latin *tirō, tirāre, possibly of Germanic origin. Compare Italian tirare.

VerbEdit

tirar

  1. (transitive) to pull
  2. (transitive) to blow (of the wind)

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.