EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • vnd [16th C.]

EtymologyEdit

From the Middle English unde (a wave), from either the Old French unde or the Latin unda (wave).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

und (plural unds)

  1. (obsolete, rare) A wave.
  2. (heraldry) A billow- or wave-like marking.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German unti, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂énti. Compare Dutch en, English and, Danish end.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ʊnt/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /ʊn/ (colloquially among many speakers)
  • (file)

ConjunctionEdit

und

  1. (co-ordinating) and
    Kaffee und Kuchen
    coffee and cake
    Ich kam, sah und siegte.
    I came, saw, and conquered.

Usage notesEdit

As seen in the second example, commas are never used before und in enumerations, even where English punctuation requires this. However, commas are used before und in certain complex sentence constructions.

InterjectionEdit

und

  1. so?, now?
    Und? Wie ist es gelaufen?
    So? How did it go?

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

und

  1. Romanization of 𐌿𐌽𐌳

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse und, from Proto-Germanic *wundō.

NounEdit

und f (genitive singular undar, nominative plural undir)

  1. (poetic) wound
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Apocopated form of undir.

PrepositionEdit

und

  1. (poetic) under

Old SaxonEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

und (with Accusative)

  1. until

ConjunctionEdit

und

  1. until
Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 16:46