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See also: Ure, urë, üre, and -ure

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman *eure, Old French uevre ( > modern œuvre), from Latin opera (work, labor). Doublet of opera

NounEdit

ure (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, only in collocations in ure, out of ure) use, practise, exercise.

VerbEdit

ure (third-person singular simple present ures, present participle uring, simple past and past participle ured)

  1. (obsolete, transitive, intransitive) To use; to exercise; to inure; to accustom by practice.
    • 1551, Ralph Robinson (translator), Utopia (1516) by Thomas More, edited by William Dallam Armes, New York: Macmillan, 1912, Book 1, p. 37,[3]
      [] the French soldiers [] from their youth have been practised and ured in feats of arms []

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ure

  1. plural of uur

AmbaiEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ure

  1. eye

DanishEdit

NounEdit

ure n

  1. indefinite plural of ur

Eastern ArrernteEdit

NounEdit

ure

  1. fire

ReferencesEdit


InterlingueEdit

NounEdit

ure

  1. (chemistry) urea

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

ure

  1. Rōmaji transcription of うれ

LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

DeterminerEdit

ure

  1. Alternative form of oure

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • ūser (Northumbrian or poetic)

EtymologyEdit

From earlier *ūser, from Anglo-Frisian *ūsær, from North Sea Germanic *ūsar, from West Germanic *unsar, from Proto-Germanic *unseraz.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

ūre

  1. our

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

PronounEdit

ūre

  1. genitive of : ours, of us

Rapa NuiEdit

NounEdit

ure

  1. penis

Usage notesEdit

Largely considered archaic; replaced by a Tahitian term.