See also: vélum and vellum

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin vēlum (a cloth, covering, awning, curtain, veil). Doublet of veil.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈviː.ləm/, /ˈvɛl.əm/
    • (file)
    • (file)

NounEdit

velum (plural vela or velums)

  1. a thin membrane resembling a veil or curtain, such as:
    1. (anatomy) the soft palate
    2. (botany) a thin membrane partially covering the cluster of sporangia near the leaf base in quillworts and their extinct relatives
    3. (mycology) a veil-like membrane of immature mushrooms extending from the margin of the cap to the stem and is torn by growth, to reveal the gills
    4. (malacology) a locomotory and feeding organ provided with cilia found in the larval stage of bivalves
    5. (zoology) a annular membrane, typically bordering a cavity, especially in certain molluscs, medusae, and other invertebrates
    6. a delicate membrane found on certain protists
  2. (meteorology) an accessory cloud resembling a veil extending over a large distance; normally associated with cumulus and cumulonimbus

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FaroeseEdit

NounEdit

velum

  1. indefinite dative plural of vel

FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin velum (veil, sail).

NounEdit

velum m (plural velums)

  1. velum

IndonesianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈvɛlʊm]
  • Hyphenation: vè‧lum

Etymology 1Edit

Learned borrowing from Latin vēlum.

NounEdit

vèlum (first-person possessive velumku, second-person possessive velummu, third-person possessive velumnya)

  1. (anatomy, linguistics) velum: the soft palate.
  2. veil: a covering for a person or thing; as, a caul.

Etymology 2Edit

From English vellum, from Old French velin (Modern French vélin), from Latin vitulinus (of a calf).

NounEdit

vèlum (first-person possessive velumku, second-person possessive velummu, third-person possessive velumnya)

  1. vellum: a type of parchment paper made from the skin of a lamb, baby goat, or calf.

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

 
vēla rubra (red sails)

EtymologyEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vēlum n (genitive vēlī); second declension

  1. a cloth, covering, curtain, veil, awning
    • a. 224, Ulpiānus, Dīgesta seu Pandectae[1], volume XXX, 41.10:
      Sed sī cancellī sint vel vēla, lēgārī poterunt, nōn tamen fistulae vel castellī.
      But while bar-doors or their veils can be legated, not so water-pipes or water-basins.
  2. (usually in the plural) the sail of a ship
  3. (anatomy) the soft palate
  This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

InflectionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative vēlum vēla
Genitive vēlī vēlōrum
Dative vēlō vēlīs
Accusative vēlum vēla
Ablative vēlō vēlīs
Vocative vēlum vēla

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • velum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • velum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • velum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • velum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to put to sea: vela in altum dare (Liv. 25. 27)
    • (ambiguous) to set the sails: vela facere, pandere
    • (ambiguous) to set the sails: vela dare
    • (ambiguous) to furl the sails: vela contrahere (also metaph.)
    • (ambiguous) sails and rigging: vela armamentaque
  • velum in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers