Last modified on 12 April 2015, at 18:32

English

See also: english

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English Englisch, English, Inglis, from Old English Englisc, Ænglisc (of the Angles; English), from Engle, Ængle (the Angles) +‎ -isc, a Germanic tribe. Compare Dutch Engels, Danish engelsk, Old French Englesche (modern French anglais), German englisch, and Spanish inglés.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ĭngʹglĭsh, IPA(key): /ˈɪŋɡlɪʃ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: Eng‧lish

AdjectiveEdit

English (comparative more English, superlative most English)

  1. Of or pertaining to England or its people.
  2. English-language; of or pertaining to the English language.
    Those immigrants Anglicised their names to make them sound more English.
  3. Of or pertaining to an Englishman (or Englishwoman).
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, The Celebrity:
      Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. He was dressed out in broad gaiters and bright tweeds, like an English tourist, and his face might have belonged to Dagon, idol of the Philistines.
  4. Of or pertaining to the avoirdupois system of measure.
    an English ton
  5. (Amish) Non-Amish.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Proper nounEdit

English

  1. (collective plural) The people of England; Englishmen and Englishwomen.
    The Scottish and the English have a history of conflict.
  2. The language originating in England but now spoken in all parts of the British Isles, the Commonwealth of Nations, North America, and other parts of the world.
    English is spoken here as an unofficial language and lingua franca.
    How do you say ‘à peu près’ in English?
  3. (Amish, collective plural) The non-Amish; non-Amish people.
  4. A surname​.

Usage notesEdit

  • The name of the language, English, when it means "the English language", does not assume an article. Hence: "Say it in plain English!"
  • The people as a collective noun require the definite article "the" or a demonstrative adjective. Hence: "The English are coming!" or "Oh, those English, always drinking their tea..."

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

NounEdit

English (usually uncountable, plural Englishes)

  1. One's ability to employ the English language correctly.
    My coworker has pretty good English for a non-native speaker.
  2. The English-language term or expression for something.
    What's the English for ‘à peu près’?
  3. Specific language or wording; a text or statements in speech, whether a translation or otherwise.
    The technical details are correct, but the English is not very clear.
  4. (countable) A regional type of spoken and or written English; a dialect.
  5. (printing, dated) A kind of type, in size between pica and great primer.
  6. (Canada, US) Spin or side given to a ball, especially in pool or billiards.
    Put more English on the ball.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

English (third-person singular simple present Englishes, present participle Englishing, simple past and past participle Englished)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To translate, adapt or render into English.
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, page 214 (2001 reprint):
      [] severe prohibuit viris suis tum misceri feminas in consuetis suis menstruis, etc. I spare to English this which I have said.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

QuotationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

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