EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

Middle English hey, from Old English hīġ, hīeġ, from Proto-Germanic *hawją (cf. West Frisian hea, Dutch hooi, German Heu), from *hawwaną ‘to hew, cut down’. More at hew.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hay (countable and uncountable, plural hays)

  1. (uncountable) Grass cut and dried for use as animal fodder.
    • Camden
      Make hay while the sun shines.
    • C. L. Flint
      Hay may be dried too much as well as too little.
  2. (countable) Any mix of green leafy plants used for fodder.
  3. (slang) Cannabis; marijuana.
    • 1947, William Burroughs, letter, 19 Feb 1947:
      I would like some of that hay. Enclose $20.
  4. A net set around the haunt of an animal, especially a rabbit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Rowe to this entry?)
  5. (obsolete) A hedge.
  6. (obsolete) A circular country dance.
    to dance the hay
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
External linksEdit

VerbEdit

hay (third-person singular simple present hays, present participle haying, simple past and past participle hayed)

  1. To cut grasses or herb plants for use as animal fodder.
  2. To lay snares for rabbits.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Huloet to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Webster's Online Dictionary article on hay

Etymology 2Edit

From the sound it represents, by analogy with other letters such as kay and gay. The expected form in English if the h had survived in the Latin name of the letter "h", .

PronunciationEdit

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with enPR or IPA then please add some!
Particularly: “Same as Ety 1 Pron? If so move that pron above Ety 1”

NounEdit

hay (plural hays)

  1. The name of the letter for the h sound in Pitman shorthand.
Related termsEdit
  • aitch, the name of the Latin letter for this sound

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

hay

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hayr

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old Spanish ha i (it has there) (compare Catalan hi ha and French il y a), from ha, third-person singular present of haber (to have), + i, from Latin ibī (there).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hay

  1. (Impersonal form) Present indicative form of haber, there is, there are
    Hay dos tiendas que venden películas.
    There are two stores that sell films.

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): /hɐj˧˧/
  • (Huế) IPA(key): /hɐj˧˧/
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): /hɐj˧˥/

AdjectiveEdit

hay

  1. exciting, interesting
    Phim này hay - This film is interesting

VerbEdit

hay [+ verb]

  1. to have a habit of (doing something)
    Con hay nói nhiều lắm - You, child, have a habit of talking too much or You, child, are talkative

ConjunctionEdit

hay (là')

  1. or
    Chọn cái này, hay chọn cái kia - Choose this one, or choose that one

Derived termsEdit

  • ơ hay, ô hay
Last modified on 11 April 2014, at 00:13