EnglishEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

From French et, in turn from Latin et

ConjunctionEdit

et

  1. (obsolete) and
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

et

  1. (colloquial or dialectal) simple past tense and past participle of eat
    • 1896: Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain), Tom Sawyer, Detective [1]
      Well, the man was astonished, of course; and first off he looked like he didn't know whether to be scared, or glad, or both, or which, but finally he settled down to being glad; and then his color come back, though at first his face had turned pretty white. So we got to talking together while he et his breakfast.
    • 1907: O. Henry, Seats of the Haughty [2]
      'Boss,' says the cabby, 'I et a steak in that restaurant once. If you're real hungry, I advise you to try the saddle-shops first.'
    • 1919: Bess Streeter Aldrich, A Long-Distance Call From Jim
      Well, I don't care if he does! I can remember the time when he et a good old-fashioned supper. And it's awful silly to call it dinner. 'Breakfast, dinner and supper, created He them.' I believe I could find them very words in the Bible if I set out to hunt.
    • 1937, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit:
      Yer can't expect folk to stop here for ever just to be et by you and Bert.
    • 18 February 1946, Life magazine:
      It must have been somethin’ I et!
    • 1996, Dana Lyons, "Cows with Guns":
      They eat to grow, grow to die / Die to be et at the hamburger fry
    • 2001, Richard Williams, The Animator's Survival Kit, page 220:
      Something I et?

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit
  • etje

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain. Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *i̯et 'to set out for; to strive'. Compare Old Irish ītu (thirst), Irish ēt (eagerness, jealousy), Latin sitis (thirst), Tocharian A yat (reach, get). Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *eus-ti-, cognate to Greek αἰτέω (aἰtéo, to demand, to beg).

NounEdit

et f (indefinite plural etje, definite singular etja, definite plural etjet)

  1. thirst

CatalanEdit

PronounEdit

et (proclitic, contracted t', enclitic te, contracted enclitic 't)

  1. you, thee (singular, direct or indirect object)

DeclensionEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the same Uralic root *e as Finnish että and Hungarian ez

ConjunctionEdit

et

  1. that

FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

et

  1. singular Imperative of eta.

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [et]
  • Hyphenation: et

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

et

  1. The second-person singular form of the negation verb. The English translations include do not/don’t and not (with auxiliary verbs and be).
Usage notesEdit
  • The negative verb is used with the connegative form of the main verb. That form is identical to the second-person singular imperative in the indicative present. The potential mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -ne-, and the conditional mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -isi-. In the indicative past, conditional past and potential past, the active past participle singular (ending -ut/-yt) is used. The connegative form of the main verb is always used without the personal suffix.
  • Usage of et:
  • Indicative:
  • Sinä näet. (You see.) -> Sinä et näe. (You do not see.)
  • Sinä näit. (You saw.) -> Sinä et nähnyt. (You did not see.)
  • Sinä olet nähnyt. (You have seen.) -> Sinä et ole nähnyt. (You have not seen.)
  • Sinä olit nähnyt. (You had seen.) -> Sinä et ollut nähnyt. (You had not seen.)
  • Conditional:
  • Sinä näkisit. (You would see.) -> Sinä et näkisi. (You would not see.)
  • Sinä olisit nähnyt. (You would have seen.) -> Sinä et olisi nähnyt. (You would not have seen.)
  • Potential:
  • Sinä nähnet. (You probably see.) -> Sinä et nähne. (You probably do not see.)
  • Sinä lienet nähnyt. (You have probably seen.) -> Sinä et liene nähnyt. (You have probably not seen.)
ConjugationEdit
  • The negative verb has no infinitive form. The negative verb is the same with indicative, conditional and potential mood and, with those moods, it is conjugated only in person. (For the second-person singular of the negative verb in the imperative mood, see älä. An archaic optative mood has also a second-person singular form, ällös.)
singular plural
first person en emme
second person et ette
third person ei eivät

Etymology 2Edit

Shortened form of että.

ConjunctionEdit

et

  1. (subordinating, colloquial) That.
SynonymsEdit
  • että (standard Finnish)

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

et

  1. and

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin et (and; plus).

ConjunctionEdit

et

  1. (archaic, poetic) Alternative form of e.

JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French et, from Latin et.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

et

  1. and

NounEdit

et m (plural ets)

  1. ampersand

SynonymsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *éti. Cognate with Old English prefix ed- (anew, again). More at ed-.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

et

  1. and
  2. (mathematics) plus
    Duo et duo sunt quattuor.
    Two plus two equals four.

Usage notesEdit

  • When used in pairs, et...et may function like English both...and

QuotationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Aragonese: y
  • Aromanian: e
  • Asturian: y
  • Catalan: i
  • Corsican: e
  • Dalmatian: e
  • French: et
  • Friulian: e
  • Galician: e
  • Ido: e,ed
  • Istriot: e
  • Italian: e, ed, et
  • Jèrriais: et
  • Ladino: i, אי
  • Middle French: et
  • Occitan: e
  • Old French: e, et
  • Old Provençal: e
  • Old Spanish: e
  • Picard: et
  • Portuguese: e
  • Romanian: e
  • Romansch: e, ed
  • Sardinian: e
  • Sicilian: e
  • Spanish: e, y
  • Volapük: e, ed
  • Walloon: et

See alsoEdit

AdverbEdit

et (not comparable)

  1. Also, too, besides, or likewise.

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hit. Cognate with German es, English it, Dutch het.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

et

  1. third-person neuter singular, nominative: it
  2. third-person neuter singular, dative: it, to it

DeclensionEdit


Middle DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

et

  1. Alternative form of het.

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin et

ConjunctionEdit

et

  1. and

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

et n

  1. an (indefinite article)


This Norwegian entry was created from the translations listed at an. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see et in the Norwegian Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) April 2008


Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

et

  1. present tense of eta and ete
  2. imperative of eta and ete

NovialEdit

ConjunctionEdit

et ... e

  1. (coordinating) both ... and

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin et

ConjunctionEdit

et

  1. and
    circa 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
    Blanches et verz, bloes et jaunes
    Whites and greens, blues and yellows.

Saterland FrisianEdit

PronounEdit

et n

  1. it

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

et f

  1. ampersand

See alsoEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English eight.

NumeralEdit

et

  1. eight

Usage notesEdit

Used when counting; see also etpela.


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic et (“meat”), from Proto-Turkic *et (meat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

et (definite accusative eti, plural etler)

  1. meat

DeclensionEdit


UzbekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *et

NounEdit

et (plural etlar)

  1. flesh
  2. meat

WalloonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin et.

ConjunctionEdit

et

  1. and
Last modified on 15 April 2014, at 21:51