Last modified on 31 May 2014, at 20:45
See also: gár, gär, går, gar-, and ġar

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English gar, gare, gere, gore, from Old English gār (spear, dart, javelin, shaft, arrow, weapon, arms), from Proto-Germanic *gaizaz (spear, pike, javelin), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰayso- (pointed stick, spear), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰey- (to drive, move, fling). Cognate with West Frisian gear, Dutch geer (pointed weapon, spear), German Ger (spear), Norwegian geir (spear), Icelandic geir (spear). Related to gore.

NounEdit

gar (plural gars)

  1. (obsolete) Spear.

Etymology 2Edit

Short for garfish..

NounEdit

gar (plural gars)

  1. Any of several fish, of the family Lepisosteidae, that have long, narrow jaws; garfish
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English garren, gerren, from Old Norse gera, gerva (Swedish göra, Danish gøre), from Proto-Germanic *garwijaną. Compare yare.

VerbEdit

gar (third-person singular simple present gars, present participle garring, simple past and past participle gart)

  1. (now chiefly UK dialectal) To make, cause (someone to do something); to cause (something to be done). [14th-19th c.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book XX:
      I shall firste begyn at Sandwyche, and there I shall go in my shearte, barefoote, and at every ten myles ende I shall founde and gar make an house of religious, of what order that ye woll assygne me [...].
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Night 15:
      Time gars me tremble. Ah, how sore the baulk! / While Time in pride of strength cloth ever stalk [...].

AnagramsEdit



BasqueEdit

NounEdit

gar

  1. blaze

BretonEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gar f (plural garoù)

  1. leg

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German garo, from Proto-Germanic *garwaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gar (not comparable)

  1. cooked
  2. ready
  3. done

Derived termsEdit

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

gar

  1. at all
    • 2010, Der Spiegel, issue 25/2010, page 80:
      Ein Verbot sollte es nach Ansicht vieler Ökonomen auch für die sogenannten Leerverkäufe geben. Banken verkaufen dabei Aktien oder Währungen, die sie noch gar nicht besitzen oder allenfalls geliehen haben.
      In the opinion of many economists there should also exist a prohibition for the so-called short sales. In these banks sell shares or currencies that they do not own at all yet or have borrowed at best.

Derived termsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gar

  1. near

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

gar m (genitive gair, nominative plural garanna)

  1. nearness, proximity
  2. favor

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gar ghar ngar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

gar

  1. rafsi of garna.

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gaizaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰays- (pointed stick, spear). Cognate with Old Frisian gēr, Old Saxon gēr, Old High German gēr, Old Norse geirr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gār m (nominative plural gāras)

  1. (poetic) spear, arrow

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: gare
    • English: gar (obsolete)

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English garren, gerren, from Old Norse gera, gǫrva, gørva (Swedish göra, Danish gøre), from Proto-Germanic *garwijaną. Compare yare.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gar (simple past and past participle gart or gert)

  1. to make (somebody or something do something)
    Whit gars ye say that? - What makes you say that?

Related termsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronounEdit

gar

  1. us (direct object)
    Cò a bhios gar cuideachadh? ― Who will help us?
Usage notesEdit
  • Adds the prefix n- to the following word if it begins with a vowel:
    Cha robh i gar n-ainmeachadh. ― She didn't mention us.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

VerbEdit

gar (verbal noun garadh)

  1. warm
    a' garadh an làmhan ris an teine ― warming their hands at the fire
Related termsEdit

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French gare.

NounEdit

gar (definite accusative [[{{{1}}}#Turkish|{{{1}}}]], plural [[{{{2}}}#Turkish|{{{2}}}]])

  1. station (railway)