See also: -갓-
U+AC13, 갓
HANGUL SYLLABLE GAS
Composition: + +
Dubeolsik input:r-k-t

[U+AC12]
Hangul Syllables
[U+AC14]

JejuEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /ka̠t̚/

NounEdit

(gat)

  1. wife
  2. woman

KoreanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

First attested in the Seokbo sangjeol (釋譜詳節 / 석보상절), 1447, as Middle Korean ᄀᆞᆺ (Yale: kos).

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gat
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gas
McCune–Reischauer?kat
Yale Romanization?kas

AdverbEdit

(gat)

  1. just now; a moment ago
    Synonyms: (mak), 방금(方今) (banggeum)
    다녀갔어요.Gat danyeogasseoyo.[He] has just been here.
    난아기gannanaginewborn (literally, “baby just now born”)
  2. just, barely; used to emphasize the newness of the state
    스무 gat seumu saljust [turned] twenty; barely twenty
Derived termsEdit
  • 갓난아기 (gannanagi, newborn, infant, literally just-born baby)
  • 갓밝이 (gatbalgi, dawn, literally just-brightening)

Etymology 2Edit

 
Korean Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ko
 
A mannequin wearing a gat.

First attested in the Hunmin jeongeum haerye (訓民正音解例 / 훈민정음해례), 1446, as Middle Korean  (Yale: kat).

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gat
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gas
McCune–Reischauer?kat
Yale Romanization?kas

NounEdit

(gat)

  1. gat; a traditional Korean hat made of horsehair, once worn by married gentlemen
    Synonym: 입자(笠子) (ipja)
  2. (mycology) pileus; cap of a mushroom
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

First attested in the Dongui bogam (東醫寶鑑 / 동의보감), 1613, as Early Modern Korean  (Yale: kas), plausibly an ancient pre-Sino-Korean borrowing from Old Chinese (OC *kreːds, “mustard plant”).[1] The Sino-Korean reading is (, gae).

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gat
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gas
McCune–Reischauer?kat
Yale Romanization?kas

NounEdit

(gat)

  1. mustard plant (Brassica juncea), or the grain thereof
Derived termsEdit
  • 갓김치 (gatgimchi, kimchi made of mustard leaves)
  • 갓나물 (gannamul, mustard greens)

Etymology 4Edit

First attested in the Daemyeongnyul jikhae (대명률직해 / 大明律直解) [The Correct Translation of the Great Ming Code], 1395, in the hungaja form (literally branch), to be understood that this word is to be pronounced similarly to the Middle Korean word for "branch", (Yale: kac).

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gat
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gas
McCune–Reischauer?kat
Yale Romanization?kas

NounEdit

(gat)

  1. (archaic) plant reserve; area whose plants cannot be cut
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gat
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gas
McCune–Reischauer?kat
Yale Romanization?kas

CounterEdit

(gat)

  1. bundle of ten dried fish or herbs
    굴비 여섯 gulbi yeoseot gatsix bunches of dried croaker fish

Etymology 6Edit

See the main entry; preserves the sibilant final (lenited to /z/ in Middle Korean and now fully lost in Seoul).

PronunciationEdit

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [ka̠(ː)t̚]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, the great majority of speakers (in both Koreas) no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?gat
Revised Romanization (translit.)?gas
McCune–Reischauer?kat
Yale Romanization?kās

NounEdit

(gat)

  1. (Gyeongsang, Chungcheong, Jeolla dialect) Dialectal form of (ga, edge, fringe)

Etymology 7Edit

A hanja created in Korea to represent a syllable without Sino-Korean equivalent.

SyllableEdit

(gat)

Extended content
  1. : Used to represent the Korean syllable [ka̠t̚] in Classical Chinese texts.
    (eumhun reading: 음역자 (eumyeokja gat))
    (MC reading: )

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Laurent Sagart (1999), “The origin of Chinese tones”, in Proceedings of the Symposium/Cross-Linguistic Studies of Tonal Phenomena/Tonogenesis, Typology and Related Topics[1], Tokyo, Japan, pages 91—104