ake

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ake ‎(third-person singular simple present akes, present participle aking, simple past and past participle aked)

  1. Archaic spelling of ache.
    • ... for let our finger ake, / And it endues our other heathfull membersOthello (Quarto 1), Shakespeare, 1622
    • 1909, Henry C. Shelley, Inns and Taverns of Old London[1], text edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2004:
      instead he went with the rogues to supper in an arbour, though it made his heart "ake" to listen to their mad talk.
    • 2015, LT Wolf, The World King (fiction), ISBN 978-1-312-37454-6:
      The ake of months of a growing firenlust became a rising queem til at last there was the burst of loosing that almost made his knees buckle.

Etymology 2Edit

Maori.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ake ‎(not comparable)

  1. forever

AnagramsEdit


BantikEdit

NounEdit

ake

  1. water

ReferencesEdit


GalelaEdit

NounEdit

ake

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Donald A. Burquest, ‎Wyn D. Laidig, Descriptive studies in languages of Maluku, volume 2 (1995), page 6:
    Tabaru Galela
    [ˈakere] 'water' [ˈake] 'water'
  • Robinson Ipol, Yosafat Etha, Deidre Shelden, Galela conversations (1989): ake

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

akē

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐌺𐌴

HawaiianEdit

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

ake

  1. rōmaji reading of あけ

SwahiliEdit

AdjectiveEdit

-ake ‎(declinable)

  1. his/her/its (third-person singular possessive adjective)
  2. their (third-person plural inanimate possessive adjective)

InflectionEdit

See alsoEdit

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