See also: Aka, AKA, A.K.A., åka, akā, āķa, a/k/a, and a.k.a.

EnglishEdit

PrepositionEdit

aka

  1. Alternative capitalization of AKA.

AnagramsEdit


FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse aka (to move, to drive) from the Proto-Indo-European *h₂eǵ-. Cognates include the Latin agō, the Ancient Greek ἄγω (agō, to lead) and the Sanskrit अजति (ájati, to drive, propel, cast).

VerbEdit

at aka (third person singular past indicative ók, third person plural past indicative óku, supine ikið)

  1. to drive

ConjugationEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse aka (to move, to drive) from Proto-Germanic *akaną, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eǵ-. Cognates include Latin agō, Ancient Greek ἄγω (agō, to lead) and Sanskrit अजति (ájati, to drive, propel, cast).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

aka (strong verb, third-person singular past indicative ók, third-person plural past indicative óku, supine ekið)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, governs dative) to drive (a vehicle)
    Aki maður gegn rauðu ljósi má hann eiga von á sekt.
    If a man drives against (i.e. past) a red light, he may expect a fine.
    aka bifreið er harla ólíkt því að aka hestvagni.
    Driving a motorcar is very different from driving a horse-drawn carriage.
  2. to move slightly, to budge

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

aka

  1. rōmaji reading of あか

KashubianEdit

NounEdit

aka

  1. hoe

LatvianEdit

NounEdit

aka f (4th declension)

  1. well (a hole in the ground, used to obtain water)

DeclensionEdit


LavukaleveEdit

ConjunctionEdit

aka

  1. then

MaoriEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Oceanic *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ.

NounEdit

aka

  1. root (of plant)

Old NorseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ak‧a

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *akaną, from Proto-Indo-European. Cognates include Ancient Greek ἄγω (agō, lead), Latin agō (do, drive) and Sanskrit अजति (ajati, drive, propel, cast).

VerbEdit

aka (singular past indicative ók, plural past indicative óku, past participle akinn)

  1. To drive (e.g. a cart).

DescendantsEdit


Rapa NuiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Oceanic *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ.

NounEdit

aka

  1. root (of plant)

Sranan TongoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch haak.

NounEdit

aka

  1. hook

TonganEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Polynesian *aka, from Proto-Oceanic *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(w)akaʀ.

NounEdit

aka

  1. root (of plant)

Torres Strait CreoleEdit

NounEdit

aka

  1. grandmother

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

aka

  1. dative singular of ak

UzbekEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic ака
Roman aka
Perso-Arabic ‍‍

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *(i)āka

NounEdit

aka (plural akalar)

  1. brother
Last modified on 31 March 2014, at 07:36