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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

ape +‎ -er

NounEdit

aper (plural apers)

  1. Someone who apes something
    • 1908, Rupert Sargent Holland, Builders of United Italy, page 175:
      Valerio ridiculed the proposal to his friends and called Cavour an aper of English customs.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German aber, from Old High German abar.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈaːpɐ]
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

aper (comparative aperer or aprer, superlative am apersten)

  1. (Switzerland, Austria) snowless

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • aper in Duden online

LatinEdit

 
aper (a wild boar)

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *apros, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ep-r-. Cognate with Proto-Germanic *eburaz, Proto-Slavic *veprь.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aper m (genitive aprī); second declension

  1. a wild boar
  2. (figuratively) a standard of the Roman legions

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (nominative singular in -er).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative aper aprī
Genitive aprī aprōrum
Dative aprō aprīs
Accusative aprum aprōs
Ablative aprō aprīs
Vocative aper aprī

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Sardinian: apru

ReferencesEdit

  • aper in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • aper in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aper in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • aper in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aper in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

aper m or f

  1. indefinite plural of ape

VerbEdit

aper

  1. present of ape

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

aper m or f

  1. indefinite feminine plural of ape