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See also: Aber, âber, and åber

Contents

AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō (hold, have).

VerbEdit

aber

  1. to have

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *aber, from Proto-Celtic *adberos. Cognate with Cornish aber (confluence, estuary), Old Welsh aper (confluence, estuary), Old Irish abor (estuary).

NounEdit

aber m, f (plural aberioù)

  1. ria, estuary, mouth of a river

VerbEdit

aber

  1. present tense of aberiñ

ReferencesEdit

  • Victor Henry, Lexique Étymologique des termes les plus usuels du Breton Moderne, Plihon et Hervé, 1900, page {{{1}}}

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Calque of Spanish a ver, short form of phrase vamos a ver ("let's see").

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: a‧ber

InterjectionEdit

aber

  1. let me see; let's see

DanishEdit

NounEdit

aber c

  1. plural indefinite of abe

VerbEdit

aber

  1. present tense of abe

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Breton aber.

NounEdit

aber m (plural abers)

  1. (geography) A ria, especially one in Brittany.

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German aber, aver, from Old High German avur, afar, from Proto-Germanic *aferą (behind). Compare Luxembourgish awer (but), Saterland Frisian oaber (but), Middle Low German āver.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

aber (coordinating)

  1. but; however; though

Usage notesEdit

  • Unlike most other conjunctions, aber need not be the first word of a clause: Ich bin dafür, er aber lehnt es ab. — “I’m in favour, but he rejects it.” In such a construction, aber might be considered an adverb, though the usual interpretation is that it is still a conjunction.
  • After a negative, sondern is used to express a contrast, while aber expresses a gradation or nuance. Compare:
Er ist nicht genial, sondern dumm.He isn’t brilliant but stupid.
Er ist nicht genial, aber ziemlich klug.He isn’t brilliant but quite intelligent.

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

aber

  1. (obsolete, except in compounds) again
  2. (qualifier) rather; quite; unusually; used with adjectives to express a surprising degree, whether this surprise be real or for effect
    Das ist aber teuer.That's rather expensive. ≈ That's more expensive than I would’ve thought.
    Du bist aber groß geworden!Look how tall you’ve become! (said to a child)
  3. nonetheless, nevertheless

Derived termsEdit


ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Shetland) IPA(key): [a(ː)bər]

NounEdit

aber (plural abers)

  1. (Shetland) sharp, keen
  2. (Shetland) clear, distinct
  3. (Shetland) sharp-sighted, observant, watchful
  4. (Shetland) eager
  5. (Shetland) greedy

VerbEdit

aber (third-person singular present abers, present participle aberin, past abert, past participle abert)

  1. (Shetland) to sharpen
  2. (Shetland, often with up) to poke a fire in order to brighten it

ReferencesEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish خبر (haber), from Arabic خَبَر (ḵabar).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ǎber/
  • Hyphenation: a‧ber

NounEdit

àber m (Cyrillic spelling а̀бер)

  1. news information
  2. message
  3. sensation, feeling

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German aber (but), turned into a noun (as in "no buts and no ifs").

NounEdit

aber n

  1. a problem, an obstacle, a difficulty

DeclensionEdit

The plural is the same, but definite forms do not apply.

ReferencesEdit


TarifitEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Tashelhit abliw

NounEdit

aber m (plural abriwen, construct state waber)

  1. eyelash

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *aber, from Proto-Celtic *adberos.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aber m, f (plural aberoedd or ebyr)

  1. estuary, mouth of a river

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
aber unchanged unchanged haber
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Zipser GermanEdit

ConjunctionEdit

aber

  1. Alternative form of åber