See also: Awo and awö

Fula

edit

Alternative forms

edit

Noun

edit

awo ngo (Garoua dialect)

  1. (Adamawa) a cotton or peanut market

References

edit
  • Tourneux, Henry, Daïrou, Yaya (1999) Vocabulaire peul du monde rural : Maroua-Garoua (Cameroun)[1] (in French), retrieved 7 May 2023

Gothic

edit

Romanization

edit

awō

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍅𐍉

Indonesian

edit

Etymology

edit

Borrowed from Tolaki [Term?].

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

awo (plural awo-awo, first-person possessive awoku, second-person possessive awomu, third-person possessive awonya)

  1. stepson, stepdaughter

Further reading

edit

Maore Comorian

edit

Alternative forms

edit

Adjective

edit

-awo (declinable)

  1. their (third-person plural possessive adjective)

See also

edit

Old Polish

edit

Etymology

edit

Univerbation of a +‎ wo.[1] First attested in the 15th century.

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): (10th–15th CE) /avɔ/
  • IPA(key): (15th CE) /avɔ/

Particle

edit

awo

  1. here!

Descendants

edit
  • Middle Polish: awo

References

edit
  1. ^ J. Karłowicz, A. Kryński, W. Niedźwiedzki, editors (1900), “awo, awoż”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), volume 1, Warsaw, page 75

Polish

edit

Etymology

edit

Inherited from Old Polish awo. By surface analysis, univerbation of a +‎ wo.[1]

Pronunciation

edit

Particle

edit

awo

  1. (Middle Polish) here!
  2. (Middle Polish) expresses uncertainty; maybe, perhaps

Conjunction

edit

awo

  1. (Middle Polish) here, thus, so
  2. (Middle Polish) then, in that case

Derived terms

edit
particle

References

edit
  1. ^ J. Karłowicz, A. Kryński, W. Niedźwiedzki, editors (1900), “awo, awoż”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), volume 1, Warsaw, page 75

Further reading

edit
  • Maria Renata Mayenowa, Stanisław Rospond, Witold Taszycki, Stefan Hrabec, Władysław Kuraszkiewicz (2010-2023) “awo”, in Słownik Polszczyzny XVI Wieku [A Dictionary of 16th Century Polish]
  • Samuel Bogumił Linde (1807–1814) “awo”, in Słownik języka polskiego
  • Aleksander Zdanowicz (1861) “awo”, in Słownik języka polskiego, Wilno 1861
  • awo in Narodowy Fotokorpus Języka Polskiego

Sranan Tongo

edit

Alternative forms

edit

Noun

edit

awo

  1. great-grandparent, ancestor, forebear
    • 1783, C. L. Schumann, Neger-Englisches Worterbuch [Negro English Dictionary]‎[3]:
      mi pikin kali mi grangmamma "hem awò" : so srefi a kali mi grangtatta "hem awò" tu.
      My child calls my grandmother "their great-grandparent"; likewise, they call my grandfather "their great-grandparent", too.
    • c. 1885, Johannes King, “Skrekiboekoe”, in Jan Voorhoeve, Ursy M. Lichtveld, editors, Suriname: Spiegel der vaderlandse kooplieden[4], Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff, published 1980, →ISBN, pages 108, 110:
      En ala dem ouloetem gran avoo vo wi ben de Afrikan ningre na ningre kondre. Na janda dem ouroetem bakra go bai dem avoo vo wi potti na ini sipi tjari koti habra da bigi soutoe watra, en dem tjari dem kom doro dia na foto Paramaribo.
      And all our forefathers of the olden days were African negroes from negro-country. It was over there that the whites of old went and bought our forefathers and put them in ships to take them across the big salt water, and brought them here to the city of Paramaribo.
    • 1994, Albert Helman, Adyosi / Afscheid[5], Nijmegen: Stichting Instituut ter Bevordering van de Surinamistiek, page 64:
      Stanfaste, Stanfaste, na fas' fa y' e gro / mi kondre mu libi: net' lek' mi awo
      Globe amaranth, globe amaranth, the way you grow is / how my country should thrive: just like my ancestors

Derived terms

edit

West Makian

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Verb

edit

awo

  1. (stative) to be long
  2. (stative) to be deep

Conjugation

edit
Conjugation of awo (stative verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person tiawo miawo aawo
2nd person niawo fiawo
3rd person inanimate iawo diawo
animate maawo
imperative —, awo —, awo

Alternative forms

edit

References

edit
  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[6], Pacific linguistics
  • James Collins (1982) Further Notes Towards a West Makian Vocabulary[7], Pacific linguistics

Ye'kwana

edit
Variant orthographies
ALIV awo
Brazilian standard awo
New Tribes awo

Pronunciation

edit

Verb

edit

awo

  1. (intransitive) to swell, to inflate

Derived terms

edit

References

edit
  • Hall, Katherine Lee (1988) The morphosyntax of discourse in De'kwana Carib, volumes I and II, Saint Louis, Missouri: PhD Thesis, Washington University, page 315
  • Hall, Katherine (2007) “w-awō-nə”, in Mary Ritchie Key & Bernard Comrie, editors, The Intercontinental Dictionary Series[8], Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, published 2021

Yoruba

edit

Etymology 1

edit

See Ede Idaca ao, Itsekiri ẹwo

Alternative forms

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

awo

  1. mystery, secret
    Synonyms: àṣírí, ohun ìkọ̀kọ̀
  2. (by extension) occult, cult, sect
  3. (by extension) Ifá, oracle
  4. (by extension) babalawo, a priest of Ifa or the divinity Ọ̀rúnmìlà
    Synonyms: babaláwo, onífá, ọlọ́rúnmìlà, aláwo, aṣawo
  5. (by extension) a respected or elder member of a guild or society of artists
Derived terms
edit

Etymology 2

edit

Cognate with Ede Idaca , Igala áwó

Alternative forms

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

awó

  1. guinea fowl
    Synonym: ẹtù

Etymology 3

edit

See Ede Idaca àò

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

àwo

  1. dish, plate
    Synonym: abọ́