EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ever, from Old English ǣfre, originally a phrase whose first element undoubtedly consists of Old English ā (ever, always) + in (in) + an element possibly from feorh (life, existence) (dative fēore). Compare Old English ā tō fēore (ever in life), Old English feorhlīf (life).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ever (not comparable)

  1. Always, frequently, forever.
    It was ever thus.
    • 1592, George Savile, 1st Marquess of Halifax, An Advertisement [] concerning Seminary Priests
      [] the Lord Treasurer, who ever secretly feigned himself to be a Moderator and Mollifier of the Catholicks Afflictions []
    • 1860, Florence Nightingale, Suggestions for Thought to the searchers after truth among the artizans of England., page 302:
      Let us ever remember that our conception, our comprehension, our feeling of God must be ever imperfect, yet should be ever advancing. We must not make God: we must find Him and feel Him more and more.
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter IX, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      “A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; []. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable, and from time to time squinting sideways, as usual, in the ever-renewed expectation that he might catch a glimpse of his stiff, retroussé moustache.
    • 1993, Nancy K. Florida, Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts: Introduction and manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta, SEAP Publications (→ISBN), page 9:
      The library staffs of the Karaton Surakarta's Sasana Pustaka, the Mangku- nagaran's Reksa Pustaka, and the Museum Radyapustaka were ever helpful and generous with their time.
    • 2007, Roman Frydman, Michael D. Goldberg, Imperfect Knowledge Economics: Exchange Rates and Risk, Princeton University Press (→ISBN)
      As with the rest of macroeconomics, the issues have to be rethought in a way that makes the ever-imperfect knowledge of market participants and policymakers an integral part of the analysis.
    • 2021 September 8, Phil McNulty, “Poland 1-1 England”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Kane picked up the ball 25 yards out with 18 minutes left before proving he is ever the opportunist by flashing a dipping swerving drive beyond the deceived Szczesny.
  2. Continuously, constantly, all the time (for the complete duration).
    People struggled to cope with the ever-increasing cost of living.
  3. At any time.
    If that ever happens, we’re in deep trouble
    He's back and better than ever.
    We've only ever talked on the phone.
    • 1897 December (indicated as 1898), Winston Churchill, chapter 3, in The Celebrity: An Episode, New York, N.Y.: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., OCLC 222716698:
      Now all this was very fine, but not at all in keeping with the Celebrity's character as I had come to conceive it. The idea that adulation ever cloyed on him was ludicrous in itself. In fact I thought the whole story fishy, and came very near to saying so.
    • 2019 February 3, “UN Study: China, US, Japan Lead World AI Development”, in Voice of America[2], archived from the original on 7 February 2019:
      He said the study provides clear evidence that AI technologies are growing at a faster rate than ever and will continue to do so.
      (file)
  4. In any way.
    How can I ever get there in time?
  5. (informal) As intensifier following an interrogative word.
    Was I ever glad to see you!
    Did I ever!

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ever (not comparable)

  1. (epidemiology) Occurring at any time, occurring even but once during a timespan.
    • 1965, Reuben Hill, The family and population control: a Puerto Rican experiment in social change:
      This family empathy measure is highly related to ever use of birth control but not to any measure of continuous use.

DeterminerEdit

ever

  1. (dialectal and informal) Shortening of every
    • 1989, Connie Jordan Green, The War at Home, page 16:
      "Ever place you look there's houses and more houses."
    • 2011, Lee Smith, Oral History →ISBN
      Queen Anne's lace ever place you look.
    • 2011, Michael Blair, Nub and Bow in History, page 27:
      A sign at the entrance to the road going up Snake Hollow reads, “Snake Hollow is a wonderful place to be, Ever place you look there is a beautiful green tree. Snake Hollow makes you feel alive and free.” Lets keep it that way, for you and me.

ReferencesEdit

  • ever at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch ēver, from Old Dutch *evur, from Proto-West Germanic *ebur. Cognate with Latin aper, Proto-Slavic *veprь (wild boar).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ever m (plural evers, diminutive evertje n)

  1. wild boar, Sus scrofa

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English ever.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ever

  1. (colloquial, youth slang) ever (with superlative)
    Das war das geilste Konzert ever.
    That was the greatest concert ever.

SynonymsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ǣfre.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛːvər/, /ˈɛvər/

AdverbEdit

ever

  1. ever

DescendantsEdit

  • English: ever
  • Scots: evire, evir
  • Yola: eyver, ere

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

ever

  1. present of eve

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ever f

  1. indefinite plural of eve
  2. indefinite plural of eva (non-standard since 2012)

AnagramsEdit