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See also: bas and bås

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch baas.

NounEdit

baas (plural baases)

  1. (South Africa) An employer, a boss. Frequently as a form of address.
    • 1979, André Brink, A Dry White Season, Vintage 1998, p. 40:
      ‘That's not what I'm complaining about, Baas,’ said Gordon.
    • 1932, George Bernard Shaw, The Adventures of the Black Girl in her Search for God, Hesperus Press Limited 1961, p. 11:
      ‘Excuse me, baas,’ she said, 'you have knowing eyes.'

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected forms.

NounEdit

baas

  1. plural of baa

VerbEdit

baas

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of baa

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

baas (plural [please provide])

  1. boss

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch baes (master of a household, friend), from Old Dutch *baso (uncle, kinsman), from Proto-Germanic *baswô. Cognates include Middle Low German bās (supervisor, foreman), Old Frisian bas (master); possibly also Old High German basa ("father's sister, cousin"; > German Base (aunt, cousin)).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /baːs/
  • Rhymes: -aːs
  • (file)

NounEdit

baas m (plural bazen, diminutive baasje n, feminine bazin)

  1. boss, chief, superior
  2. employer, manager
  3. (Belgium) strong or tough guy
  4. (video games) boss
  5. (figuratively) crack, master, expert at something
  6. (figuratively) whopper, large one in its kind
  7. (diminutive: baasje) fellow, boy, especially a youngling or novice

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


HiligaynonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish bajar.

VerbEdit

báas

  1. diminish, lessen