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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bist, beest, best, from Old English bist ("(thou) art"; second person singular of bēon (to be)), from Proto-Germanic *biusi ((thou) art), equivalent to be +‎ -est. Cognate with West Frisian bist ((thou) art), Low German büst ((thou) art), German bist ((thou) art).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bist

  1. (Britain dialectal, Bristol, West Country, Northern England) Originally used to form the second person singular of be, but can denote other present tense forms, such as: are, am, is
    • 1875, Mark Lemon, Henry Mayhew, Tom Taylor, Punch:
      Thee bist rayther too much a feelosofer, I be afeard, for me.
    • 1904, Henry Branch, Cotswold and vale:
      Lookee, thee bist purty, my love; lookee, thee bist purty: thee hast dove's eyes betwix thy locks; thy locks be like a flock o' ship fur thickedness.
    Where bist goin'.
    Where are you going?
    I bist goin' 'ome.
    I am going home
    How bist?
    How are you?

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German bist. Cognate to Middle Dutch bes, best[1], dialectal English bist, beest.

German bist has two sources:

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɪst/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

bist

  1. Second-person singular present of sein.
    Du bist nicht mein Sohn.
    You are not my son.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ A. van Loey, Schönfeld's Historische Grammatica van het Nederlands, 8. druk 1970, →ISBN; §147a
  2. ^ Kluge, Friedrich (1989), “bin”, in Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological dictionary of the German language] (in German), 22nd edition, →ISBN

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English bist ("(thou) art"; second person singular of bēon (to be)), from Proto-Germanic *biusi ((thou) art), equivalent to been +‎ -est.

VerbEdit

bist

  1. Second-person singular present indicative form of been

Usage notesEdit

This form is less common than art for the second-person singular.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: bist, beest (archaic or dialectal)

WakhiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Tajik бист (bist).

NumeralEdit

bist

  1. twenty

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bist n (plural bisten, diminutive bistje or bistke)

  1. animal, beast
    De bisten binne fuort.The animals are gone.

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • beest”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

YagnobiEdit

NumeralEdit

bist

  1. twenty

Further readingEdit

  • Ronald Emmerick, Iranian, in Indo-European Numerals (1992, →ISBN, edited by Jadranka Gvozdanovic), page 312