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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English curious, corious, from Old French curios, from Latin curiosus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

curious (comparative curiouser or more curious, superlative curiousest or most curious)

  1. (obsolete) Fastidious, particular; demanding a high standard of excellence, difficult to satisfy.
    • 1612, John Smith, Proceedings of the English Colonie in Virginia, in Kupperman 1988, p.172:
      But departing thence, when we found no houses, we were not curious in any weather, to lie 3 or 4 nights together upon any shore under the trees by a good fire.
    • Thomas Fuller (1606-1661)
      little curious in her clothes
  2. Inquisitive; tending to ask questions, investigate, or explore.
    Young children are naturally curious about the world and everything in it.
  3. Prompted by curiosity.
  4. Unusual; odd; out of the ordinary; bizarre.
    The platypus is a curious creature, with fur like a mammal and a beak like a bird.
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      Captain Edward Carlisle, soldier as he was, martinet as he was, felt a curious sensation of helplessness seize upon him as he met her steady gaze, her alluring smile ; he could not tell what this prisoner might do.
  5. (archaic) Exhibiting care or nicety; artfully constructed; elaborate; wrought with elegance or skill.
    • And the curious girdle of the ephod, which is upon it, shall be of the same, according to the work thereof; even of gold, of blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine twined linen.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      his body couched in a curious bed

TranslationsEdit

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