DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *uz- in unstressed positions. The Middle Dutch er- prefix mostly merged with ver- and her- in Modern Dutch. The current prefix is therefore either a direct continuation of this prefix or loaned from Old High German ir-, Middle High German er-. A prefix with the same origin but in stressed positions is oor-.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

PrefixEdit

er-

  1. Inseparable verbal prefix that indicates the cause or beginning of an action.

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German ir-, from Proto-Germanic *uz-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛɐ̯/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /ɛ/, /ɐ/ (common speech)

PrefixEdit

er-

  1. Inseparable verbal prefix that indicates a successful conclusion, leads to the wanted result.
  2. Inseparable verbal prefix that indicates killing or dying.
    er- + ‎drücken (to push, squeeze) → ‎erdrücken (to squeeze dead)
    er- + ‎frieren (to freeze) → ‎erfrieren (to freeze to death)
  3. Prefix signifying a notion of getting something by some means, usually through conscious effort.
    er- + ‎arbeiten (to work) → ‎erarbeiten (to gain something by means of working for it)

Usage notesEdit

  • In sense 3, the prefix is of almost unlimited productivity. Such random constructs as sich etwas ertanzen (to get something by dancing), sich etwas erkuscheln (to get something by cuddling), etc., are all possible and intelligible.

Derived termsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German er-, from Old High German ir- or from Low German er-, from Middle Low German er-, from Old Saxon ā-, both from Proto-Germanic *uz-.

PrefixEdit

er-

  1. Inseparable verbal prefix that indicates an emphasizing meaning

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit