Afrikaans

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Etymology

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From Dutch ver-, a merger of two Middle Dutch prefixes:

Pronunciation

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Prefix

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ver-

  1. to do or to become what the stem (following this prefix) refers to
  2. used to indicate that the action (referred to by the stem) has a negative connotation (for the direct object of the stem)
  3. to move or change in the manner specified by the stem

Usage notes

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Not separable. When forming past participles, those generally aren't prepended with the prefix ge-.

Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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The result of a merger of two Middle Dutch prefixes:

The first origin is cognate with Old High German ur-, ir- (German ur-, er-), Old English ā-, Gothic 𐌿𐌶- (uz-).

The second origin is cognate with Old English for- (English for-), Old High German fir-, far- (German ver-), Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌹𐍂- (fair-), 𐍆𐌰𐌿𐍂- (faur-), 𐍆𐍂𐌰- (fra-).

Prefix

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ver-

  1. to do or to become what the stem (following this prefix) refers to
    ver- + ‎minder (less, fewer) → ‎verminderen (to reduce)
  2. used to indicate that the action (referred to by the stem) has a negative connotation (for the direct object of the stem)
    ver- + ‎werpen (to throw) → ‎verwerpen (to reject)
    ver- + ‎oordelen (judge) → ‎veroordelen (to condemn)
  3. to move or change in the manner specified by the stem
    ver- + ‎deel (a part) → ‎verdelen (to split into parts)
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Afrikaans: ver-
  • Javindo: fer-

Etymology 2

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A contraction of older van der (of the),[1] which is also common in surnames.

Prefix

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ver-

  1. A prefix found as part of surnames, found mainly in the southern Netherlands and in Belgium.
Derived terms
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References

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Faroese

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Etymology

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From Old Norse verr, from Proto-Germanic *weraz, from Proto-Indo-European *wiHrós. Cognate with English were-.

Prefix

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ver-

  1. -in-law.

Usage notes

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  • Originally and officially, this prefix only refers to the husband's in-laws; however, colloquially, it is also used for the wife's in-laws.

Derived terms

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German

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Etymology

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From Middle High German ver-, from Old High German far-, from a mixture of Proto-Germanic *firi-, *fra-, *furi- and other similar particles. Cognate with English for-, Dutch ver-, Yiddish פֿאַר־ (far-), Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌹𐍂- (fair-), 𐍆𐌰𐌿𐍂- (faur-), 𐍆𐍂𐌰- (fra-), Latin per-.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /fɛr/, [fɛɐ̯-] (prescriptive standard)
  • IPA(key): /fər/, [fɐ-] (alternative standard; much more common, except when provided with emphatic stress)
  • Audio:(file)

Prefix

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ver-

  1. Inseparable verbal prefix for- (clarification of this definition is needed)
    vergeben (to forgive)
  2. Inseparable verbal prefix that denotes a transition of the object into a state, which is indicated by the stem.
    ver- + ‎lieben (to love) → ‎sich verlieben (to fall in love)
    ver- + ‎urteilen (to pronounce judgement) → ‎verurteilen (to convict)
  3. Inseparable verbal prefix indicating a faulty action.
    ver- + ‎laufen (to walk) → ‎sich verlaufen (to get lost)
    ver- + ‎zählen (to count) → ‎sich verzählen (to miscount)
    ver- + ‎gießen (to pour) → ‎vergießen (to spill)

Derived terms

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See also

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Luxembourgish

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Pronunciation

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Prefix

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ver-

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Derived terms

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Middle Dutch

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Etymology

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    From Old Dutch far-, for-, fer-, from a merger of Proto-Germanic *firi-, *fur-, *fra-.

    Prefix

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    ver-

    1. Forms verbs indicating change away from a state.
    2. Forms verbs indicating a more thorough action.

    Derived terms

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    Descendants

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