English

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Bata drums (from left: Okónkolo, Iyá, Itótele)
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Yoruba bàtá.

Noun

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bata (plural bata)

  1. A ceremonial double-headed drum played in triplet in the religion of santería, especially in Cuba and Puerto Rico, originally from the Yoruba of Nigeria.
    • 1990 October 28, Paul Simon, “The Rhythm of the Saints”, in The Coast, Warner Bros.:
      Two guitars, bata, bass drum and tambourine.
    • 2019, Marlon James, Black Leopard, Red Wolf, Hamish Hamilton, page 283:
      Five drummers in front setting the dance—three beating barrel drums, a fourth beating a double-skin bata, and the fifth beating four small bata tied together.

Anagrams

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Afar

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /baˈta/ [bʌˈtʌ]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta

Noun

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batá f 

  1. doum fruit

References

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  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[1], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Basque

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /bata/ [ba.t̪a]
  • Rhymes: -ata
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta

Etymology 1

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From bat (one, some) +‎ -a (definite article).

Numeral

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bata

  1. absolutive singular of bat (one)

Pronoun

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bata (indefinite)

  1. one, someone
Usage notes
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  • Southern dialects tend to use this form in all cases rather than bat.
  • When used in coordination with bestea (other, another), the indefinite form isn't used.
Declension
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Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Spanish bata (dressing gown).

Noun

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bata inan

  1. dressing gown, robe
Declension
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Further reading

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  • bata”, in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia [General Basque Dictionary], Euskaltzaindia, 1987–2005

Bikol Central

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Etymology 1

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Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta
  • IPA(key): /baˈtaʔ/, [baˈtaʔ]

Noun

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batâ (Basahan spelling ᜊᜆ)

  1. stink; stench; reek
    Synonym: bangog
    Antonym: hamot
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta
  • IPA(key): /ˈbataʔ/, [ˈba.taʔ]

Noun

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batà (Basahan spelling ᜊᜆ)

  1. (Naga, informal) lover; partner
    Synonyms: ilusyon, piday, katrato
Derived terms
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Etymology 3

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Borrowed from Spanish bata.

Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta
  • IPA(key): /ˈbata/, [ˈba.ta]

Noun

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báta (Basahan spelling ᜊᜆ)

  1. robe
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Etymology 4

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Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta
  • IPA(key): /ˈbataʔ/, [ˈba.taʔ]

Interjection

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batà (Basahan spelling ᜊᜆ)

  1. (Legazpi) Alternative form of atà (I told you)

Butuanon

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Etymology

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From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bataq.

Noun

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bata

  1. child

Cebuano

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bataq, from Proto-Austronesian *bataq.

Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta
  • IPA(key): /ˈbataʔ/, [ˈba.t̪ɐʔ]

Noun

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batà

  1. child
  2. juvenile; young
  3. sprout
  4. protégé of someone of higher rank
    Synonym: bata-bata
  5. (colloquial) mistress
    Synonyms: kabit, kerida

Adjective

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batà

  1. young

Verb

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batà

  1. to spend someone's early years in; to spend childhood years in
  2. to grow up by or in an area or town
Quotations
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For quotations using this term, see Citations:bata.

Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Spanish bata.

Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta
  • IPA(key): /ˈbata/, [ˈba.t̪ɐ]

Noun

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bata

  1. woman's nightgown
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Etymology 3

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Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta
  • IPA(key): /ˈbata/, [ˈba.t̪ɐ]

Verb

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bata

  1. to divide into equal parts or bundles to be sold
Derived terms
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  • batabata (to estimate the quantity of something)

Further reading

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  • Fr. Juan Felis de la Encarnación (1851) Diccionario bisaya-español[2] (overall work in Cebuano and Spanish), Amigos del País
  • bata” in Pinoy Dictionary, Cyberspace.ph, 2010-2022.

Anagrams

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Chavacano

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Spanish bata (robe).

Noun

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báta

  1. house gown; dressing gown

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Cebuano bata, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bataq, from Proto-Austronesian *bataq.

Noun

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batà

  1. child
    Synonym: anak

Chichewa

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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báta class 5

  1. quietness

Crimean Tatar

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Noun

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bata (Northern dialect)

  1. little brother

Usage notes

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  • Corresponding words in standard Crimean Tatar: kadâ, qardaş.

Declension

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Synonyms

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Dibabawon Manobo

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Etymology

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From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bataq, from Proto-Austronesian *bataq.

Noun

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batà

  1. child; baby

Ede Idaca

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Etymology

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Cognates include Edo ibata and Yoruba bàtà

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bàtà

  1. shoe

References

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  • Baloubi, Désiré (2005) The Morphophonemics of the Idaacha dialect of Yoruba[3], Charlotte, North Carolina: Conquering Books, →DOI, →ISBN, page 41

Galician

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Verb

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bata

  1. inflection of bater:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Garo

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Verb

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bata

  1. to cross, to pass

Higaonon

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Etymology

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From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bataq, from Proto-Austronesian *bataq.

Noun

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bata

  1. child
  2. offspring

Hiligaynon

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Spanish bata.

Noun

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báta

  1. nightshirt, nightgown

Etymology 2

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From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bataq, from Proto-Austronesian *bataq.

Noun

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batà

  1. child, baby, boy, girl
  2. son, daughter
  3. servant

Verb

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batà

  1. to give birth

Etymology 3

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Noun

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batâ

  1. uncle

Iban

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [bata]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta

Noun

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bata

  1. brick:
    1. a hardened rectangular block of mud, clay etc., used for building.

Igbo

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Etymology

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From ba (enter) + -tá (towards).

Verb

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batá

  1. to enter, to come in.

Indonesian

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Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈbata]
  • Rhymes: -ta, -a
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta

Etymology 1

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From Malay bata (brick). Cognate of Balinese ᬩᬢ (bata, brick), Javanese ꦧꦠ (bata, brick, brick wall; cube), Old Javanese bata (brick; wall).

Noun

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bata (plural bata-bata, first-person possessive bataku, second-person possessive batamu, third-person possessive batanya)

  1. brick:
    1. a hardened rectangular block of mud, clay etc., used for building.
      Synonym: batu bata
    2. something shaped like a brick.
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Probably from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bataq, from Proto-Austronesian *bataq. Compare to Tagalog bata (child). (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

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bata (first-person possessive bataku, second-person possessive batamu, third-person possessive batanya)

  1. marriage between siblings and siblings at the same time.

Further reading

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Irish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Middle English batte (bat), from Old French batte (pestle), from the verb batre (to beat), from Latin battuō, perhaps of Celtic origin.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bata m (genitive singular bata, nominative plural bataí)

  1. stick
  2. baton
  3. (of wind) gust
  4. (of drink) measure

Declension

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Derived terms

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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bata bhata mbata
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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Jamamadí

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Etymology 1

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Adjective

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bata

  1. (Banawá) rotten

Etymology 2

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Verb

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bata

  1. (Banawá) to pick

References

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Kabuverdianu

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Etymology

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From Portuguese bata.

Noun

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bata

  1. uniform
  2. apron

References

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  • Gonçalves, Manuel (2015) Capeverdean Creole-English dictionary, →ISBN

Makasae

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Noun

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bata

  1. stalk

Maltese

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Root
b-t-j (suffering)
3 terms

Etymology

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Borrowed from Sicilian patiri, from Vulgar Latin *patīre, from Latin patī. An early borrowing, as attested by the initial b-; compare biċċa.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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bata (imperfect jbati, verbal noun tbatija)

  1. to suffer

Conjugation

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    Conjugation of bata
singular plural
1st person 2nd person 3rd person 1st person 2nd person 3rd person
perfect m batejt batejt bata batejna batejtu batew
f batiet
imperfect m nbati tbati jbati nbatu tbatu jbatu
f tbati
imperative bati batu

Maranao

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Noun

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bata

  1. concrete, cement

Marshallese

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English father, from Middle English fader, from Old English fæder, from Proto-West Germanic *fader, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr.

Pronunciation

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  • (phonetic) IPA(key): [pˠɑːdˠɑ], (enunciated) [pˠɑ tˠɑ]
  • (phonemic) IPA(key): /pˠæɰtˠæɰ/
  • Bender phonemes: {bahtah}

Noun

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bata

  1. a priest

Verb

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bata

  1. to be a priest

References

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Polish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈba.ta/
  • Rhymes: -ata
  • Syllabification: ba‧ta

Noun

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bata m

  1. genitive singular of bat

Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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  • Rhymes: -atɐ
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ta

Etymology 1

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Noun

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bata f (plural batas)

  1. white coat
    Synonym: jaleco
    • 1995, José Saramago, Ensaio sobre a cegueira, Caminho, page 26:
      […] depois levantou-se, despiu a bata em movimentos cansados, lentos.
      […] next he got up and took off his white coat with tired, slow movements.

Etymology 2

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Verb

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bata

  1. inflection of bater:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Scottish Gaelic

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Middle English batte, from Old French batte. Akin to Irish bata.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bata m (plural bataichean)

  1. a staff, a walking stick

Serbo-Croatian

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Noun

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bata (Cyrillic spelling бата)

  1. genitive singular of bat

Shona

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Etymology

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From Proto-Bantu *-jípata.

Verb

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-bátá (infinitive kubátá)

  1. hold, grasp
  2. touch

Sotho

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Verb

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bata

  1. to be cold

Spanish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈbata/ [ˈba.t̪a]
  • Rhymes: -ata
  • Syllabification: ba‧ta

Etymology 1

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Borrowed from French ouate.

Noun

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bata f (plural batas)

  1. dressing gown, robe
  2. lab coat
  3. smock
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Tagalog bata (or from the same word in other Philippine languages, such as Cebuano bata, Hiligaynon bata, etc).

Noun

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bata m (plural batas)

  1. (Philippines) child

Etymology 3

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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bata

  1. inflection of batir:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Further reading

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Swahili

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bata
 
Swahili Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sw

Etymology

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From Arabic بَطّ (baṭṭ), بَطَّة (baṭṭa).

Pronunciation

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  • Audio (Kenya):(file)

Noun

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bata (ma class, plural mabata)

  1. duck (aquatic bird of the family Anatidae)

Derived terms

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Tagalog

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bataq, from Proto-Austronesian *bataq. Also possibly from Sanskrit वत्स (vatsa, child, offspring) or Sanskrit बटु (baṭu, boy, lad, youth). Compare Tausug bata'.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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batà (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜆ)

  1. child; kid
    Synonyms: paslit, bulilit
    • 2020, Ervin Santiago, “Frankie tinawag na ‘KSP at miserableng bata’ ng basher: Be like your Ate KC!”, in Bandera[4]:
      WALANG patumanggang tinawag ng basher si Frankie Pangilinan na miserableng bata na uhaw sa atensyon.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
  2. follower; supporter
  3. protégé
  4. (colloquial) sweetheart; boyfriend or girlfriend
    Synonyms: kasintahan, katipan, kasuyo, (male) nobyo, (female) nobya, (slang) siyota, (slang) jowa
  5. (colloquial) mistress; paramour
    Synonyms: kaapid, kabit, kalaguyo

Adjective

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batà (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜆ)

  1. young
  2. junior; younger
  3. childish; childlike
Derived terms
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See also
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Spanish bata.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bata (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜆ)

  1. house gown; dressing gown
  2. robe (loose, outer garment)
  3. (strictly) bathrobe
Derived terms
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Etymology 3

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Possibly from Sanskrit वठ् (vaṭh, to be able).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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batá (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜆ)

  1. ability to endure pain, hardship, etc.
Derived terms
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Further reading

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  • bata at KWF Diksiyonaryo ng Wikang Filipino[5], Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino, 2021
  • bata”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018
  • Zorc, R. David, San Miguel, Rachel (1993) Tagalog Slang Dictionary, Manila: De La Salle University Press, →ISBN, page 16

Tausug

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Etymology

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From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bataq, from Proto-Austronesian *bataq.

Noun

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bata

  1. child

Derived terms

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Ternate

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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bata

  1. (stative) to be spotted

Conjugation

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Conjugation of bata
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st tobata fobata mibata
2nd nobata nibata
3rd Masculine obata ibata, yobata
Feminine mobata
Neuter ibata
- archaic

References

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  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Tok Pisin

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Etymology 1

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From English butter.

Noun

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bata

  1. butter

Etymology 2

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Unclear; probably from English betel

Noun

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bata

  1. betel
    Synonym: daka

See also

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Yogad

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Adjective

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batá

  1. wet

Yoruba

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Alternative forms

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Etymology 1

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Cognates include Edo ibata. Possibly related to or from Baatonum bataku or Baatonum bara

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bàtà

  1. shoe
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Bàtá mẹ́ta

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bàtá

  1. batá drum, a kind of drum sacred to the orisha Ṣàngó, it is one of the 4 families of drums (ìlù) among the Yoruba.
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • English: bata
  • Portuguese: batá
  • Spanish: batá
  • Nupe: bàǹtá