See also: fadé and faɗe

English edit

 
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Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /feɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English fade, vad, vade (faded, pale, withered, weak), from Middle Dutch vade (weak, faint, limp), from Old French fade (weak, witless), of obscure origin. Probably from Vulgar Latin *fatidus, from Latin fatuus (insipid).

Adjective edit

fade (comparative fader, superlative fadest)

  1. (archaic) Weak; insipid; tasteless.
    Synonym: dull
    • 1825, Francis Jeffrey, Lord Jeffrey, review of Theodric by Thomas Campbell
      Passages that are somewhat fade.
    • 1827, Thomas De Quincey, “The Last Days of Kant”, in Blackwood's Magazine:
      His masculine taste gave him a sense of something fade and ludicrous.
Translations edit

Noun edit

fade (plural fades)

  1. (golf) A golf shot that curves intentionally to the player's right (if they are right-handed) or to the left (if left-handed).
    Coordinate terms: slice, hook, draw
    • 2011, James Lythgoe, The Golf Swing: It's all in the hands, page 88:
      If you confine yourself to hitting straight shots while you are developing your golf swing, you are less likely to develop a preference for hitting a fade or a draw.
  2. A haircut where the hair is short or shaved on the sides of the head and longer on top. See also high-top fade and low fade.
    Synonym: skin fade
  3. (slang) A fight.
  4. (music, cinematography) A gradual decrease in the brightness of a shot or the volume of sound or music (as a means of cutting to a new scene or starting a new song).
  5. (slang) The act of disappearing from a place so as not to be found; covert departure.
    • 1991, Stephen King, Needful Things:
      Ace could have done a fade. Instead, he gathered all his courage — which was not inconsiderable, even in his middle age — and went to see the Flying Corson Brothers.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

fade (third-person singular simple present fades, present participle fading, simple past and past participle faded)

  1. (transitive, golf) To hit the ball with the shot called a fade.
    • 2011, Gary McCord, Golf For Dummies, page 284:
      The Golden Bear faded the ball from left to right with great consistency, so he seldom had to worry about trouble on the left.
  2. (intransitive) To grow weak; to lose strength; to decay; to perish gradually; to wither, as a plant.
  3. (intransitive) To lose freshness, color, or brightness; to become faint in hue or tint; hence, to be wanting in color.
  4. (intransitive) To sink away; to disappear gradually; to grow dim; to vanish.
    The milkman's whistling faded into the distance.
    • c. 1596–1598 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act III, scene ii]:
      He makes a swanlike end, / Fading in music.
    • 1856, Eleanor Marx-Aveling (translator), Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary, Part III Chapter XI,
      A strange thing was that Bovary, while continually thinking of Emma, was forgetting her. He grew desperate as he felt this image fading from his memory in spite of all efforts to retain it. Yet every night he dreamt of her; it was always the same dream. He drew near her, but when he was about to clasp her she fell into decay in his arms.
    • 1968 December 8, Henry Cosby, Sylvia Moy, Stevie Wonder (lyrics and music), “I’d Be a Fool Right Now”, in For Once in My Life, performed by Stevie Wonder:
      They say your love will surely fade girl
      When things go wrong and trouble calls
    • 2021 December 29, Nigel Harris, “Comment: Problems galore in 2021...”, in RAIL, number 947, page 3:
      And with that, I think we'll leave 2021's tail lamp to fade into the distance.
  5. (transitive) To cause to fade.
  6. (transitive, gambling) To bet against (someone).
    • 2016, Johnny Hughes, A Texas Beauty, Smart and Strong:
      I tried to get some bets that y'all were fixin' to get married but nobody would fade me.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Alternative forms edit

Synonyms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English fade, fede, of uncertain origin. Compare Old English ġefæd (orderly, tidy, discreet, well-regulated). See also fad.

Adjective edit

fade (comparative fader or more fade, superlative fadest or most fade)

  1. (archaic) Strong; bold; doughty.

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fade

  1. definite of fad
  2. plural of fad

Noun edit

fade n

  1. indefinite plural of fad

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

< Swedish fader (father)

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɑde/, [ˈfɑ̝de̞]
  • Rhymes: -ɑde
  • Syllabification(key): fa‧de

Noun edit

fade (slang)

  1. father

Declension edit

Inflection of fade (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative fade fadet
genitive faden fadejen
partitive fadea fadeja
illative fadeen fadeihin
singular plural
nominative fade fadet
accusative nom. fade fadet
gen. faden
genitive faden fadejen
fadeinrare
partitive fadea fadeja
inessive fadessa fadeissa
elative fadesta fadeista
illative fadeen fadeihin
adessive fadella fadeilla
ablative fadelta fadeilta
allative fadelle fadeille
essive fadena fadeina
translative fadeksi fadeiksi
abessive fadetta fadeitta
instructive fadein
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of fade (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative fadeni fadeni
accusative nom. fadeni fadeni
gen. fadeni
genitive fadeni fadejeni
fadeinirare
partitive fadeani fadejani
inessive fadessani fadeissani
elative fadestani fadeistani
illative fadeeni fadeihini
adessive fadellani fadeillani
ablative fadeltani fadeiltani
allative fadelleni fadeilleni
essive fadenani fadeinani
translative fadekseni fadeikseni
abessive fadettani fadeittani
instructive
comitative fadeineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative fadesi fadesi
accusative nom. fadesi fadesi
gen. fadesi
genitive fadesi fadejesi
fadeisirare
partitive fadeasi fadejasi
inessive fadessasi fadeissasi
elative fadestasi fadeistasi
illative fadeesi fadeihisi
adessive fadellasi fadeillasi
ablative fadeltasi fadeiltasi
allative fadellesi fadeillesi
essive fadenasi fadeinasi
translative fadeksesi fadeiksesi
abessive fadettasi fadeittasi
instructive
comitative fadeinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative fademme fademme
accusative nom. fademme fademme
gen. fademme
genitive fademme fadejemme
fadeimmerare
partitive fadeamme fadejamme
inessive fadessamme fadeissamme
elative fadestamme fadeistamme
illative fadeemme fadeihimme
adessive fadellamme fadeillamme
ablative fadeltamme fadeiltamme
allative fadellemme fadeillemme
essive fadenamme fadeinamme
translative fadeksemme fadeiksemme
abessive fadettamme fadeittamme
instructive
comitative fadeinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative fadenne fadenne
accusative nom. fadenne fadenne
gen. fadenne
genitive fadenne fadejenne
fadeinnerare
partitive fadeanne fadejanne
inessive fadessanne fadeissanne
elative fadestanne fadeistanne
illative fadeenne fadeihinne
adessive fadellanne fadeillanne
ablative fadeltanne fadeiltanne
allative fadellenne fadeillenne
essive fadenanne fadeinanne
translative fadeksenne fadeiksenne
abessive fadettanne fadeittanne
instructive
comitative fadeinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative fadensa fadensa
accusative nom. fadensa fadensa
gen. fadensa
genitive fadensa fadejensa
fadeinsarare
partitive fadeaan
fadeansa
fadejaan
fadejansa
inessive fadessaan
fadessansa
fadeissaan
fadeissansa
elative fadestaan
fadestansa
fadeistaan
fadeistansa
illative fadeensa fadeihinsa
adessive fadellaan
fadellansa
fadeillaan
fadeillansa
ablative fadeltaan
fadeltansa
fadeiltaan
fadeiltansa
allative fadelleen
fadellensa
fadeilleen
fadeillensa
essive fadenaan
fadenansa
fadeinaan
fadeinansa
translative fadekseen
fadeksensa
fadeikseen
fadeiksensa
abessive fadettaan
fadettansa
fadeittaan
fadeittansa
instructive
comitative fadeineen
fadeinensa

Synonyms edit

Further reading edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Vulgar Latin *fatidus, blend of Latin fatuus and vapidus.

Adjective edit

fade (plural fades)

  1. tasteless, insipid
  2. boring; lukewarm
Synonyms edit
Descendants edit
  • Swedish: fadd

Noun edit

fade m (plural fades)

  1. (criminal slang) share of loot / booty

Verb edit

fade

  1. inflection of fader:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin fata (the Fates). See fada.

Noun edit

fade f (plural fades)

  1. (regional) fairy.
    — C’est le trou aux fades, mon parrain.
    — Les fades ! N’est-ce pas les fées que tu veux dire ?
    — Je ne connais pas les fées, mon parrain.
    — Mais, qu’est-ce que c’est que les fades ?
    — C’est des femmes qu’on ne voit pas, mais qui font du bien ou du mal.
    "It's the hole of the feys, boss."
    "The feys! Don't you mean to say fairies?"
    "I don't know the fairies, boss."
    "But what are the feys?"
    "They're women we don't see, but who do good or evil."
    (George Sand, Jeanne, 1844)

Further reading edit

Galician edit

Verb edit

fade

  1. inflection of fadar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

German edit

Alternative forms edit

  • fad (particularly in southern Germany and Austria)

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French fade, from Vulgar Latin fatidus.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fade (strong nominative masculine singular fader, comparative fader, superlative am fadesten or am fadsten)

  1. bland, flavorless, stale, boring
    • 1922, Rudolf Steiner, Nationalökonomischer Kurs, Erster Vortrag
      Solch eine Volkswirtschaftslehre würde der Engländer fade gefunden haben. Man denkt doch über solche Dinge nicht nach, würde er gesagt haben.
      An Englishman would have thought of such an economical theory as bland. He would have said, "One doesn’t think about such things."
  2. flat (of carbonated beverages)

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • fade” in Duden online
  • fade” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Portuguese edit

Verb edit

fade

  1. inflection of fadar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Yola edit

Pronoun edit

fade

  1. Alternative form of faade
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 71:
      Fade teil.
      What ails.
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 2, page 84:
      Well, gosp, c'hull be zeid; mot thee fartoo, an fade;
      Well, gossip, it shall be told; you ask what ails me, and for what;
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 13, page 90:
      He at nouth fade t'zey, llean vetch ee man,
      He that knows what to say, mischief fetch the man,

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 39