See also: Fella

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From fellow.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /fɛ.lə/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛlə

Noun edit

fella (plural fellas)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of fellow.
  2. (informal) Used as a term of address for a male person.
    Am I right, fellas?
    • 1997, Donald Meichenbaum, “Discussion”, in Jeffrey K. Zeig, editor, The Evolution of Psychotherapy: The Third Conference, page 90:
      By the third go-around, the essence of what I wrote was, "And the same to you, fella!" I am glad that our relationship has survived that exchange.
  3. (Australian Aboriginal) Used as a general intensifier; a pfella.
    • 1990, Jimmy Chi, “Bran Nue Dae”, in Anita Heiss, Peter Minter, editors, Anthology of Australian Aboriginal Literature, Montreal, Que., Kingston, Ont.: McGill–Queen’s University Press, published 2008, act II, page 137:
      This fella song all about the Aboriginal people, coloured people, black people longa Australia. Us people want our land back, we want 'em rights, we want 'em fair deal, all same longa white man. Now this fella longa Canberra, he bin talkin' about a Bran Nue Dae—us people bin waiting for dijwun for 200 years now.
  4. (Russo-Ukrainian war) An Internet troll engaged in information warfare against Russia.

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Bislama: -fala, -pela
  • Pijin: -fala
  • Tok Pisin: -pela, -pla

Translations edit

Faroese edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse fella, from Proto-Germanic *fallijaną. Causative of falla (to fall).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

fella (third person singular past indicative feldi, third person plural past indicative feldu, supine felt)

  1. to fell
  2. to snare

Conjugation edit

Conjugation of fella (group v-8)
infinitive fella
supine felt
participle (a7)1 fellandi feldur
present past
first singular felli feldi
second singular fellir feldi
third singular fellir feldi
plural fella feldu
imperative
singular fella!
plural fellið!
1Only the past participle being declined.

Icelandic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse fella, from Proto-Germanic *fallijaną. Causative of falla (to fall).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

fella (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative felldi, supine fellt)

  1. (transitive, governs the accusative) to fell, to shed
  2. (transitive, governs the accusative) to kill in battle
  3. (transitive, governs the accusative) to fit together
  4. (transitive, governs the accusative) to pleat

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

fēllā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of fēllō

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

fella m or f

  1. definite feminine singular of felle

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse fella. Akin to English fell.

Verb edit

fella (present tense feller, past tense felte, past participle felt, present participle fellande, imperative fell)

  1. to fell, bring down (make something fall, e.g. an animal, a tree, an opponent in battle)
  2. to shed (e.g. a person shedding tears, a tree shedding leaves)

Noun edit

fella f (definite singular fella, indefinite plural feller or fellor, definite plural fellene or fellone)

  1. (pre-2012) alternative form of felle
  2. definite singular of felle

References edit